Vegan in Rotterdam

Poor Rotterdam. It never had a fighting chance to win my affections. I arrived on a chilly, rainy afternoon after spending a few (relatively) warm, sunny days in Amsterdam. With my hood up against the wind and the occasional raindrop, I began the half-hour walk from the (admittedly striking) train station to my AirBnB with a minor sense of unease, and it only grew the further I walked. It wasn’t that the city seemed unsafe — more that it was slightly unwelcoming. I saw almost no one on my half-hour walk, a striking change after busy Amsterdam. The streets were unsettlingly quiet. The city gave off a distinctly barren vibe. The modern, clean lines of Rotterdam’s buildings were a jarring change from Amsterdam’s old-world charm, and they didn’t do much for me on that grey day.

Rotterdam central station

Shout out to Mr. Yawning Scooterist! (The blue skies appeared the morning I left… of course.)

I wish I could say my impression improved as the day went on, that I found a bit of charm in a seemingly charmless city. It didn’t happen, though. Perhaps the weather was to blame, but I found myself listless and anxious to leave. I gave the city a fighting chance, or as fighting a chance as I could in just under 24 hours. I had a good wander and I saw a few of the top sights, but I just didn’t connect with it.

Which is not to say the city has nothing to recommend it. The Museum Boijmans van Beuningen was an absolute highlight, with a surprisingly diverse collection. Although I got in for free thanks to my Museum Pass, I’d have happily paid the price of admission (€17,50 for adults as of January 2018). An eclectic yet engaging mix of Old Masters, Impressionists, Expressionists, Surrealists (and undoubtedly many more -ists) makes up the main collection, so you’re not sure what to expect in the next room. It’s also quite an educational spot; I didn’t know much about the De Stijl movement before spending time here, but the curators have done an excellent job of tracking the movement and I spent good long time reading through the signage. (Which, as a side note, is why I adore solo museum-ing. Free reign to… read!)

The museum also houses a fantastic display of “household objects that chart the history of design over eight centuries.” As I wandered through the basement rooms, I kept expecting the collection to come to an end — and then I’d turn the corner and find yet another room of, say, mid-mod chairs or pipes (including a charming one that’s shaped like a dog).

The museum was blissfully quiet and uncrowded, a welcome change from the tourist-filled museums of Amsterdam. I was impressed and gratified I’d made the walk, and spent a few happy hours exploring.

Vegan cake in RotterdamAfter all that intense arting, I needed sustenance — in the form of cake. I headed to Heavenly Cupcakes, grateful for a chance to sit indoors and sip a hot beverage after a chilly walk. I ordered a slice of vanilla cake with raspberries and buttercream; it was perfectly serviceable, if a bit dense in texture. My perfect afternoon pick-me-up would’ve included a side of espresso, but alas: The espresso machine was being serviced at the very moment I stopped by. A pot of hot tea made a suitable replacement, and I enjoyed a leisurely snack in the otherwise empty cafe before heading back into the chill.

Suitably sugared up, I walked to the can’t-miss destination you’ll find on all city guides to Rotterdam: the Markthal (Market Hall). 

A vast indoor market characterized by its striking curved and reflective exterior, a dizzying indoor mural, and dozens of stalls, the Markthal is as good a place as any to spend a few hours in Rotterdam. Although it previously housed a vegan-friendly eatery, on my visit the Markthal was sadly devoid of much vegan fare, as far as I could tell. Still, there were plenty of bulk shops and a few bars, so you can always buy looseleaf tea and/or get a beer! Neither of which I did, but — you could.

The area around the Markthal also features the stunning elevated yellow cube houses that sometimes crop up on Pinterest and make you do a double-take. They’re even more impressive in person than in photos, and I wandered in the little cube-y “neighborhood” for a good while, wondering whether I should’ve shelled out for an AirBnB room in one of them. But I hadn’t, so eventually I returned to my regular ol’ AirBnB to charge my phone and fret over what to do next. I decided to keep it simple and go for dinner. Burgertrut was just a mile away, so I hoofed it to this indie eatery for a — you guessed it — burger.

The place was packed when I arrived, with patrons who skewed heavily towards the hipster more than the hippie. (I didn’t realize overalls are now “on trend” until I saw a band of teens rocking them!) Luckily, the relaxed atmosphere meant I could grab an open seat on a couch and order from there, rather than waiting for a table to open up. I was seated right next to a visiting artist who was working on some kind of wall mural. Burgertrut is just one piece of a larger organization that includes a public studio and a communal art space. We chatted briefly while I waited for my food, and then I adopted an awkward silence and pulled out a book to read. As one does.

While Burgertrut is not a fully veg establishment, it does have a fair few thoughtfully crafted vegan options alongside its organic meaty burgers. I opted for the curry burger with a side of fries and vegan mayo and found it all perfectly tasty (especially with a beer). Wholly sated, I decided to call it a night and headed back to my AirBnB.

The next morning, I hoofed it to Rotterdam Centraal where I grabbed breakfast: an Alpro vanilla yogurt and a cup of fruit. This ersatz parfait was a surprisingly filling breakfast, and I thanked the vegan gods that Europe sees fit to sell vegan yogurt in its train stations. And then I was off. Bruges was my next stop, and as I’ve shared, it blew me away.

So, Rotterdam. I left feeling perfectly happy to put it in my rear-view mirror, but also with a tiny crumb of regret. Maybe I shouldn’t have expected it to be like so many other European cities I love; by its very nature, it’s a different beast. Rotterdam sustained heavy bombing during World War II, and rather than try to recreate its older architecture, the city was designed anew in a much more modern style. And while I did enjoy and appreciate elements of that style — the Markthal and the cube houses, to name a few — perhaps I needed to clear my mental slate and judge the city on its own merits, not in Amsterdam’s glow.

Pooping dog statue, RotterdamAnd if I’m honest, there were a few moments that made me think Rotterdam had hidden depths I left unplumbed. I saw a few pairs of honest-to-goodness punks, for example, that made my counterculture heart sing a bit. These were not the try-hard young hipsters of Amsterdam but grizzled old-school punks, and a quick Google search does indeed indicate that Rotterdam is home to a legitimate punk scene. I’ve also heard that Rotterdam is tops if you enjoy clubbing and “nightlife,” but as I spend 99% of my nights on the couch knitting, reading, or re-watching The Office, this fact holds no appeal for me. (Another high point? Finding this statue of Fikkie the dog… and his poo. Yes, I consider this a high point. No, I am not ashamed.)

My one actual Rotterdam regret is not taking an afternoon trip to see the Kinderdijk waterfalls (see here and here). It had been on my tentative to-do list, but the timing just didn’t work out — you have to take a water bus over to them, and the schedule didn’t make sense given my limited time in the city. They look really lovely, though, and they remain on my bucket list.

All in all, with six months of retrospection behind me, I’m glad I visited Rotterdam. The cube houses had been on my to-see list for years, and my sense of the Netherlands as a whole country was deepened by my visit. Will I return? I could be convinced. It’s easily accessible by train, so a half-day visit could happen at some point — and definitely with a visit to Kinderdijk built in. Maybe I’ll even shell out for a cube house for a night.

Other vegan options in Rotterdam

My pre-visit list of Rotterdam vegan restaurants wasn’t huge since I knew I’d only be spending a single night there. Here are a few places I didn’t get to try.

  • Gare du Nord: Vegan bistro in a train car! Lots of organic,and local options. Reservations recommended.
  • Happy Kitchen: Eco-friendly eatery and small grocery store featuring vegan foods that skew towards the organic, raw, and whole-foods-based.
  • Tribestlife Raw Food Kitchen: Cafe with a bevy of raw, organic, gluten-free, sugar-free, and vegan menu items. Choose among small bites, heartier dishes, sweet treats, and plenty of hot and cold drinks.


Vegan in Rotterdam, Holland // govegga.com24 hours in Rotterdam // vegan Rotterdam eats //


Vegan in… Bethel, Alaska?

If you haven’t heard of Bethel, Alaska, no worries — you’re not alone. Until a few weeks ago, neither had I. Located in the expansive state’s southwest coast, nestled into the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Bethel is 400 miles from Anchorage and feels worlds away from the tourist-filled hotspots of Denali or the Kenai Fjords. Inaccessible by road, the only way in is via plane. Some folks are lucky enough to get on a 737, but I made my way from Anchorage to Bethel on a prop plane. The clip-clip-clip of the propellers became background noise as I watched soaring snow-capped peaks give way to marshy, flat tundra, with a series of increasingly frequent rivers snaking their way through the Alaskan bush.

Flight from Anchorage to Bethel -- propeller over marshy tundraAlaska was not on my already-extensive travel list for this year, but when I had an opportunity to travel there for work, I responded with an immediate “Yes, please, when does the plane leave?” I won’t scoop my own story, but I was there to report on (and help with) our work providing vet services and supplies to three villages in the Y-K Delta. It was a surreal six days, easily the most unique and unforgettable week of travel I’ve ever had. We traveled by boat, by 4-wheeler, by large jet, by tiny Cessna, by our own two feet, and — once — by bicycle.

Because all groceries and supplies must be flown in to Bethel and the surrounding villages, you’ll pay a pretty penny for nearly everything, even more so than in locations closer to Alaska’s “big” cities. Plus, the villages themselves have only small general stores with limited provisions. So our team came prepared, with suitcases loaded full of veg-friendly staples. I personally packed my weight in bars: Clif, Luna, Lara, and all their friends. I fully expected to subsist wholly on processed proteins for six days.

"Be Healthy in Bethel" public artwork on a dumpster in Bethel, Alaska

But! Bethel had some surprises in store. While on a group food run at the local grocery-cum-hardware-cum-everything-else store*, I was flabbergasted to see not one but two brands of vegan yogurt: Daiya and, absurdly, Kite Hill. (I can barely find Kite Hill around here!) Next to the yogurt was a row of Daiya’s new-ish farmhouse block cheeses. A few rows over, we found Califia brand almond milks, along with the more common Silk and Almond Breeze. And there were two — two! — types of tofu. Yes, everything cost more than you’d pay in the Lower 48, but darn it if we didn’t buy a block of Daiya Gouda. Voting with our dollar, indeed. (One thing we could not find? Hummus!)

I didn’t snag a photo of the nondairy display, but you can use your imagination. Just include an image of me, jaw dropping Home Alone-style, and you’ll have an even more accurate picture.

So, vegans: If you’re heading to rural Alaska, you might just get lucky when it comes to nondairy delights. It never hurts to look!

*I can’t remember the name of the store with 100% certainty, but I’m pretty sure it was Swanson’s. It was definitely not the flashy, new-looking grocery store, though — that one had an “organic/natural food” section but did NOT have nearly as many nondairy treats!

Vegan in The Hague

I had grand plans for my trip to Amsterdam: I was going to take SO MANY DAY TRIPS to the little cities and towns dotted around Amsterdam proper. Delft, Utrecht, Leiden, Haarlem, The Hague… they’re all just a quick and inexpensive train ride away! I could be there and back in an afternoon! I would see it all!

…yeah, no. Sure, I technically had the time to fit in all (well, most) of those little jaunts, but I would have had to travel every single day. And I would have missed out on the absolute best parts of this trip: wandering around Amsterdam, savoring meals slowly, and leisurely strolling through museums. I’m glad I lifted the burden of trying to see it all from my shoulders and opted instead to do what I wanted to do in the moment. I ended up taking just one day trip and decided on the destination with pure pragmatism: I was going on a Sunday, and many of the museums in my potential destination cities would be closed.

View from the Mauritshuis in Den Haag, the Netherlands

View from the Mauritshuis in The Hague

The Mauritshuis in The Hague, however, was open for business. Considering that the Mauritshuis is home to Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring, two special Rembrandts (The Nightwatch and The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp), and a particularly charming Jan Steen (As the Old Sing, So Pipe the Young), The Hague (or Den Haag, if you prefer the Dutch name) seemed like a fine choice.

And it was. The Sunday crowds were sparse, the sun was out to counteract a chill in the air, and I thoroughly enjoyed my time in this internationally important city. My only real disappointment? The Den Haag location of De Vegetarische Slager (the Vegetarian Butcher) was closed! This purveyor of vegetarian and vegan meats runs a “concept store” in The Hague, with a fully vegan menu of deli sandwiches and other lunch specialties. Sigh.

De Vegetarische Snackbar

De Vegetarische Snackbar, Den HaagMany of the other vegan places on my list were also closed, so I meandered through the city to De Vegetarische Snackbar instead. The walk took me through some more residential neighborhoods, which I always enjoy, and led me to an unassuming storefront in a little row of restaurants.

In my experience, old-school veg joints go one of two ways: There are the hippie-inspired, sprouts-n-tofu, peace and love joints (see: De Bolhoed in Amsterdam), but there are also the more hardcore, punk-inspired, surly-tattooed-server joints as well. De Vegetarische Snackbar falls into that latter category (minus the surliness).

The massive menu is all vegetarian and heavy on the junk food, with lots of burgers and fake meats. Clearly-labeled vegan options make ordering relatively simple, although it took a few tries for me to communicate my order (the lupine burger) to the server. Whereas almost all vegan-friendly restaurants in Amsterdam had staffers who spoke very good English, there was a little language barrier in The Hague. (Not, of course, that that’s a bad thing; just something to be aware of. I tried learning some Dutch before I went but found it bizarrely tricky. I usually have a knack for foreign languages, so that was a bit of a surprise.)

My lupine burger, though impressive to the eye and just fine to the palate, was nearly impossible to eat as assembled. I am developing something of an aversion to these massive buns. Honestly, can anyone actually fit that whole thing in their mouth?! It’s impossible and painful, like you’re going to either dislocate your jaw or rough up the sides of your mouth. So instead you have to deconstruct it and either shovel bits and pieces into your maw or weirdly eat it with a fork and knife, which is somehow nearly as inelegant as using your hands! I think menus should come with a warning if a given burger features a massive bun. Then you could ask for a smaller, softer one instead.

Anyway, my experience at De Vegetarische Snackbar was clearly marred by my discomfort and irritation at trying to eat a giant burger without looking like a total fool. I should have gotten the bitterballen instead.

Other options

I truly wish I’d had more time to try some of the other vegan joints in The Hague, because this seemingly buttoned-up city has plenty to offer.

  • De Vegetarische Slager: The aforementioned vegetarian butcher. Closed Sundays and Mondays, alas.
  • FOAM: The name stands for “Fresh Organic And Meat-free.” All-vegan restaurant open for breakfast and lunch only… maybe dinner if you eat on grandparent time. :)
  • Quinta Verde: Vegan “lunchroom” open from 9 am to 6 pm, serving breakfast, lunch, and even a prix-fixe brunch.
  • Veggies on Fire: Vegan restaurant serving dinner nice and late, from 5 pm to 11 pm, Wednesdays through Saturdays. Great reviews and lots of creative raw options.

Along with De Vegetarische Snackbar, these four eateries were the ones that caught my eyes and made it on to my shortlist. But check out the HappyCow listing for The Hague: This city has tons of veg-friendly establishments! It’s really quite impressive.


Vegan in The Hague //






Vegan in Bruges

Kelly in Bruges

Bruges: the sleeper hit of my recent trip to Holland and Belgium. I booked two nights in this small city on a bit of a whim; I knew it was deliciously quaint and charming, but not much more than that. As a consummate planner and preparer, even this tiny dipping of the toe into semi-spontaneous travel was exhilarating. But then, the night before I arrived, I started to regret my choice.

It was a Wednesday night in Rotterdam. I was bored. I was cold. I was heading to Belgium the following morning and I was wondering whether I’d made a mistake. I’d been enjoying Amsterdam so much that by comparison, Rotterdam couldn’t help but disappoint me. (More on that later.) What if Bruges was the same? What if I found myself in a boring, tiny city with nothing to do, nothing to see, and only the relative comfort of a few vegan restaurants to sustain me? Why had I booked two whole nights there without doing more research?!

Bruges, Belgium // copyright Kelly WilliamsWell. Those fears were, of course, unfounded. My arrival in Bruges felt charmed. The sun was out, the day was warm, and I was riding high after a brief stop in Antwerp to change trains. I’d found Antwerp absolutely breathtaking, to my surprise and delight, and my expectations for Bruges were raised in kind.

The whole walk into Bruges from the central train station had me grabbing my phone to snap photo after photo, mouth agog in sheer delight and surprise at the city’s charm. It’s impossibly quaint, like something out of a Disney movie. And it’s a bit like Amsterdam writ small, with slightly shorter buildings, fewer canals, and a more compact city center. I’m sure the fact that I was staying in a incredible 500-year-old canal-side hotel didn’t hurt my impression of the place! (See below. Shout out to travel hacking!)

Hotel Ter Brughe, Bruges, Belgium

Even the crowd is different. Whereas Amsterdam plays host to droves of hen parties, stag parties, and college students on break, Bruges’ visitors seemed of a more — ahem — mature inclination. I’m guessing it’s a popular stop on European bus tours that cater to older travelers, because I saw quite a few groups of pensioners following a tour guide’s bobbing umbrella around the city. To my partying-averse self, that was a good thing (even if I did have to endure the slow-moving groups clogging up the sidewalks more than a few times). I’ll take a dozen retirees dawdling through a guided tour over a dozen liquored-up frat boys any day of the week.

Bruges, BelgiumAnd about that fear of boredom: Bruges may be small, but there’s lots to see and do. Even though I took it easy on the touristing front, I was never bored. I visited just a few hotspot locations and instead spent my time enjoying the sunshine, meandering through the blissfully bike-free streets (well, relatively bike-free), and eating. Always eating.

It’s surprisingly easy to find vegan food in Bruges, especially considering that this is a relatively small city. I spent two nights and barely two days there, so I didn’t get to sample everything, but I was so impressed with the places I did visit. Read on for details and a list of the eateries I didn’t get to try.


If you are in Bruges, go to #food (pronounce it “hashtag food”) for dinner. If it’s sunny, ask to sit outside — there’s a hidden patio out back, so you can enjoy the sun while you enjoy some fantastically creative food. This relatively new restaurant does serve meat, but it’s also incredibly vegan-friendly. Everything is clearly labeled, and the servers get it when you say you’re vegan: after ordering my vegan entree, my server brought me a bowl of spicy popcorn and reassured me that it was vegan even before I had a chance to ask.

#food is definitely trying hard to project an image of quirky eccentricity, which generally irks me. (Everything is very colorful, and the restaurant eschews place mats, opting for records instead.) However, the menu is so genuinely creative and playful that it justifies all that quirky decor. I ordered the Coconut Oil, which is described as “lasagna with coconut, sweet ’n sour sauce, pineapple and lots of veggies, with fruity salad.”

Now, calling this dish “lasagna” is a bit of a stretch… but who cares when it tastes so good? Thinly sliced zucchini, pineapple chunks, and coconut made up the bulk of this souffle-esque casserole-y dish. (It really defied description.) I wasn’t sure whether I’d like the sweet ‘n sour flavor profile, but it was absolutely perfect alongside the tropical ingredients. And thanks to a generous topping of pomegranate seeds, toasted coconut, edible flowers (!), and passionfruit, there were plenty of textures to set off the more souffle-like main dish. The fruity salad on the side was also a masterpiece, featuring a very light vinaigrette over salad greens, tomatoes, grated carrots, golden raisins, strawberries, grapes, orange slices, and a gorgeous Rainier cherry on top. The fact that I thoroughly enjoyed this salad must be a testament to my more refined palate, right? Because this combination of fruit and veggies in the same dish would not have met with my approval just a few years ago!

#food is a bit on the pricey side, especially for Bruges, but I considered it well worth my money for the attentive service and the thoughtfully prepared dishes. I was seated by a large British family who ordered quite a few different dishes, and to a person they all raved about their meals. My only regret: not ordering dessert. But! On the way out, the server (who I believe is the owner) handed me a raspberry aquafaba meringue. “For our vegan guests,” he said. What a treat.

Royal Frituur

In Belgium, a “frituur” is an eatery that serves quick, fried foods, including the famous Belgian fries. Royal Frituur takes that concept and expands it to include a bevy of vegan and gluten-free options. No, it’s not healthy — again, this place is literally designed to serve deep-fried foods — but it’s a fantastic option for vegans who are sad they can’t enjoy the fries from Bruges’ ubiquitous fry stalls. (They’re cooked in animal fat, typically lard or ox fat. Gross.)


This is a small place, a little outside the city center, but still an easy walk given Bruges’ relatively small size. It was not very busy when I arrived around 7:00 pm on a Friday. Staffed by a single woman, most likely the owner, it’s a small, relatively unassuming joint, with all the various vegan and non-vegan patties, burgers, balls, and other fryables on display in a front case. What makes Royal Frituur so remarkable is the sheer variety it offers, from your average soy-based patty to the hazelnut one I chose. I believe the proprietor carries a few items from De Vegetarische Slager (aka The Vegetarian Butcher), a meat substitute specialist that supplies much of Europe with all sorts of meat-free goodies. (They have a great backstory, too.)

Anyway, my hazelnut burger was crunchy and filling, if not particularly exciting. I also got a small order of fries, which turned out to be too large for my small tummy. But the dip — a horseradish mayo — was really tasty. (Royal Frituur has six vegan fry sauces.)


A few quirks of Royal Frituur: To sit at the small lunch counter, you’ll need to buy a drink (hence my sparkling water in the photo above). It’s also cash-only. Everything is relatively inexpensive, however, so it’s a great place to use up those euro coins burning a hole in your pocket. If the weather’s nice, forego the lunch counter and head to the park just around the corner. You can find an empty bench and take a gander at the Sint-Janshuis windmill, which is still used to grind flour today.

Other vegan options in Bruges

Given my short stay in Bruges, I didn’t get to try too many veg-friendly joints. The city happened to be hosting a food truck festival starting the Friday I was there, and all the flyers advertised vegan food. So I visited the festival and grabbed a couple of vegan momos for lunch on Friday. They were tasty, but they also meant I missed out on another restaurant visit. Oh well. Here are a few other places that never made it off my list and onto my itinerary.

  • Books and Brunch: Used book store and tea room with vegetarian and veganizable options. Only open 9 to 5, so best for breakfast or a light lunch.
  • De Bron Vegetarian: Small vegetarian eatery offering a single main dish each day. Cash only.
  • De Plaats: I tried to hit up this centrally located vegetarian restaurant on my first night, but it was unexpectedly closed (according to the hand-written sign out front). HappyCow reviews are mixed, but I thought it looked cute.
  • For a wonderfully comprehensive resource of all things vegan in Bruges, check out Trudi’s list on the Bruges Vegan blog.

General tips + recommendations

  • If the weather is nice, you could certainly do worse than grabbing a few to-go items at the many Carrefour Express spots around the city center and enjoying them in the middle of Markt square. I did just that one morning, with a super-tasty Alpro mango quark yogurt and an accidentally vegan apple pastry. (Side note: Why is quark (regular or vegan) not a thing in the States?! The Alpro version was a thick, pudding-like yogurt, and I loved it!)
  • For beer enthusiasts, a visit to the family-run Brouwerij De Halve Maan is a must. The beer you’ll sample on the tour (Brugse Zot) is vegan, and they even serve a tasty unfiltered version you can’t get elsewhere. I’ve been on plenty of brewery tours, but this was one was especially fun and informative. Plus, you get a great rooftop view of the city at one point! There’s also a pleasant beer garden if you want to extend your post-tour drinking beyond the one free sample. (And they have a crowdfunded BEER PIPELINE that transports the beer underground across the city to the bottling plant. How neat is that?!)


Vegan in Bruges, Belgium // Vegan in Bruges, Belgium //




Vegan in Amsterdam

Tell someone you’re going to Amsterdam and you’ll likely receive a knowing smirk in return. “Oh, Amsterdam, eh? I hear the coffeeshops are great…” Wink wink, smirk smirk. As if permissive pot laws are the only reason you might visit this stunning, unique, and culturally significant city.

Amsterdam houses with reflections in the canal; copyright Kelly Williams

As a matter of fact, said laws didn’t play much of a role in my decision to book a nine-day trip to the city.* My travel bucket list includes pretty much the entire world, so when I saw a $381 round-trip flight to Amsterdam pop up back in February, I jumped on it. Amsterdam would be my first solo trip. I couldn’t wait to spend hours meandering through some of the best museums in the world, all on my own, and eating amazing vegan food, all on my own. I booked accommodations for Amsterdam and Rotterdam in Holland, and then two nights in Bruges, Belgium. I’d get to knock two new countries off my list, and I’d see them all on my own time.

And then Luna died, just two days before I was set to leave. And all my excitement — for seeing a new city, for traveling alone — vanished. I considered canceling. I still wanted to go, but I didn’t know whether I could — or would — enjoy myself. I asked for guidance in one of my favorite female travel groups on Facebook, and nearly everyone said the same thing: If you at all think you’ll regret staying home, just go instead. But be kind to yourself and don’t force yourself to sightsee more than you want. Just do what makes you happy.

Amsterdam flowers and bridge

Steven — amazing, supportive Steven — agreed. He said he’d be OK staying home alone with Moria while I was gone. So I went. And as I said on Sunday, I’m so glad I did. So, so glad. Yes, there were semi-public tears and moments when grief hit me unexpectedly. (Being away on the one-week anniversary of her death was particularly hard.) But that was OK. I let it happen.

One unexpected side effect of my sadness was a lack of hunger. Anxiety hits me in the stomach, and in the first five or so days after Luna died, I could barely eat. I did, somewhat, because I knew I needed sustenance. But I didn’t really have an appetite. So during my first couple days in Amsterdam, I was walking 10+ miles a day and barely able to eat — yikes! (I also couldn’t sleep. I really don’t know how I walked so much on so little.)

With time, though, my appetite returned, and I’m happy to say that I finally got to enjoy some pretty amazing vegan food in Amsterdam. Read on for that, and for some additional tips on finding vegan options in Amsterdam. Enjoy!

Beter & Leuk

Located a bit off the beaten path in Amsterdam Oost (East), Beter & Leuk is a sweet little cafe with plenty of vegan options. It was a bit of a hike from my hotel, and of course I chose to make the trek on a drizzly, grey morning, but it made my visit all the better: I waited out the rain, enjoying a matcha almond milk latte and a scone while people-watching and reading. #bliss.

Beter and Leuk Amsterdam

The scone was served with little pots of coconut yogurt and fruity jam, which seems to be common in the region. Both made great accompaniments to the dense, oaty scone, and all in all it was a surprisingly filling little breakfast. The matcha latte… well, I won’t say too much about that except that it wasn’t the best I’ve had. Oh well. Can’t win ’em all. Note that Beter & Leuk does offer light lunch options, and according to the menu, it also serves a veganizable high tea — something I have yet to experience but really need to try. High tea for one, however, didn’t seem very inviting! Next time I’ll have to bring Steven with me. :)

CT Coffee & Coconuts

I loved CT Coffee & Coconuts the minute I stepped inside. Housed in an old theater in the cute de Pijp neighborhood, the cafe is bright, light, and surprisingly spacious — there are three levels, with all sorts of seating options and arrangements. The vibe is pretty unique: hipster trendy (think exposed brick and white accents) meets laid-back tropical island style. And it works, somehow. I enjoyed this place so much I came back for breakfast on my very last morning, just before heading to the airport.

Although CT Coffee & Coconuts is actually open all day from 8 am to 11 pm, I only ate breakfasts there — but I have no regrets. Both of my choices were phenomenal. I opted for the overnight buckwheat porridge on my first visit, which features buckwheat blended with coconut water and banana and topped with fresh fruit, almonds, and an incredible mango-basil coulis. I need to recreate this meal; the flavors were perfection and I loved the toasty, nutty blended buckwheat.

On my second visit, I chose the green coconut bowl, which incorporates buckwheat in another form: the cafe’s signature “buckini,” a lightly sweetened buckwheat-based granola. Fresh fruit and a generous helping of buckini top off a fabulous mango, passion fruit, spinach, avocado, and coconut milk smoothie — a perfect mix of textures and flavors that also just looks really darn pretty.

I also tried two coffee drinks. The first, an oat milk latte, was fine. But the second, the “coconut coffee,” was quite honestly the best cold coffee beverage I’ve had in recent memory — and it’s disarmingly simple! Just a double espresso shot blended with coconut milk, agave, and ice. The proportions must be magic or something, because this was heavenly. Another one to recreate!

De Bolhoed

One of Amsterdam’s very first vegetarian restaurants, De Bolhoed definitely has that signature old-school veg vibe. From the physical menus (printed in Papyrus on paper gone soft with age) to the menu items (somewhat uninspired, but also exactly what you’d expect to find in an old-school vegetarian restaurant) to the decor (lots of color and local art), this place reminds me of so many other similar vegetarian joints around the world. It also has a very minimal online presence and is cash-only, so be prepared for that.

De Bolhoed, Amsterdam

I ate here one night and found the experience fine. Not great, not terrible, but fine. I ordered the vegan plate of the day, which was a sampling of six vegan options on a single plate, from a simple side salad to a warm seitan stew. Most components tasted fresh and healthy, although the pile of bulgur grains was a bit boring and the house white wine was too sweet for my taste. I didn’t have a reservation, so I sat at a communal table and chatted with an Aussie couple on holiday in Europe. I didn’t mind that, although I did feel a bit conspicuous when I pulled out my book to read — I did that at pretty much every other restaurant I visited and never felt out of place, but for whatever reason, I didn’t actually want to linger at De Bolhoed. It just didn’t feel very cozy or welcoming. That said, this restaurant does feature an elusive resident kitty, so it’s got that going for it! (I saw her just once, briefly, before she slunk out of sight.)

Meatless District

This trendy, hipster-friendly all-vegan eatery in Oud-West (named after and visually inspired by New York City’s meatpacking district) receives rave reviews from eaters of all persuasions, and for good reason. Meatless District offers innovative, exciting takes on veg-centric dishes alongside more familiar options.

Case in point: The meals I enjoyed on my two dinner visits to MD. The first — a cauliflower steak — falls squarely in the “innovative takes” category. This was a massive piece of cauliflower with a spicy marinade and glaze, served with roasted baby potatoes, roasted red onion, coconut bacon, and a little salad of cherry tomatoes and basil. I was glad my appetite had returned by this point, because it was a LOT of food! But so, so good. The cauliflower was tender and juicy, marinated to perfection and perfectly complemented by the crunchy coconut bacon bits. That little side salad of tomatoes and basil was a lovely fresh accompaniment, too. Mmm. I enjoyed this alongside a glass of a white wine and finished up with a steaming mug of fresh mint tea. So, so good.

My second meal at MD was their signature cheeseburger: a tempeh, tofu, and tomato patty topped with cheese, veggies, and pickles. This came with a huge side of fries and their “MDnaise” dip, a flavored mayo. This one was tasty, but not really a standout. You won’t regret ordering it, but you’d be better served by choosing one of their more plant-forward dishes. That said, if you’re craving a filling veggie burger, this will do the trick. (I followed mine up with another mug of mint tea. The perfect stomach-settler!)


It’s always helpful look up a few vegan-friendly chain restaurants when you’re heading to a new city, and SLA fits perfectly into this category with 10 locations sprinkled around Amsterdam. SLA offers a plant-forward take on quick, healthy, filling salads, although they do serve a few meaty options. You can either build your own massive salad or choose from the menu, which changes seasonally. And because everything is clearly labeled as vegan or not, you don’t have to worry about potential minefields (salad dressing, I’m looking at you!).

SLA was actually my first stop for food on the Saturday I arrived in Amsterdam. I wasn’t particularly hungry (see above), but I’d been traveling for 14 or so hours without a real meal, and I knew I should eat. Nothing heavy or complex appealed, so I opted for the relatively simple green bowl (shown above right). With lentils, quinoa, broccoli, zucchini, edamame, avocado, parsley, pepitas, and sunflower seeds, this is a bowl that’s jam-packed with healthy (and tonally matching!) ingredients. The dressing — a blend of apple cider vinegar, olive oil, spirulina, basil, and lemon — sounded promising, but unfortunately it was rather bland. I actually wanted more, and I’m usually a light-dressing-only gal. Still, this was a perfect meal for a stomach that wanted to refuel itself with minimal fuss. My only other complaint was that the avocado felt a bit under-ripe, but avocados are notoriously difficult to evaluate!

I hit up SLA again on my second to last day in Amsterdam, grateful for its convenient locations and friendly opening hours. By this point, my stomach troubles had dissipated, so I opted for the more flavorful vegan sushi bowl, which features raw spinach, red rice, edamame, tamari tempeh, pickled kohlrabi, nori, and sesame seeds. This dressing — allegedly a blend of tamari, raspberries, soy yogurt, ginger, sesame oil, and red pepper — was certainly more present than the green bowl’s dressing, but it tasted more vinegary than it had a right to be based on its ingredients. Still, this was another tasty bowl, and so filling that I almost couldn’t finish it!

One downfall of SLA’s massively filling mains is that they leave no room for dessert! I’m now kicking myself for not grabbing a slice of raw strawberry and vanilla vegan cheesecake to go, but the storing-and-eating-later logistics were tricky. Next time!


Places like Vegabond make my heart happy. This tiny all-vegan shop and cafe packs quite a punch into its small space: You can pick up all sorts of vegan food products (including imports!), household objects, and even clothing while you wait for a delicious vegan snack, coffee beverage, or dessert to be prepared. It’s also super close to the Anne Frank House and Westerkerk — a convenient stopping point in the middle of a busy day of sightseeing.

On my first foray to Vegabond, I picked up a quick to-go lunch and munched it while sitting on a sunny bench by one of the canals. Bliss! I’d ordered an open-faced sandwich, which featured arugula, cherry tomatoes, cashew cheese, and olive oil on a gorgeous thick slice of spelt bread. Simple, but perfect for savoring while sitting in the sun. I returned to Vegabond the very next day for another snack. This, however, was a less sunny day (darn you, fickle weather of Holland), and I opted to enjoy my tofu sausage roll and espresso (odd combo, I know) while sitting on one of Vegabond’s cozy couches, safely protected from the drizzle and the cold. That tofu roll was heavenly: spicy chunks of “sausage” ensconced in a flaky pastry. I almost went back for a second roll!

If you’re in Amsterdam, consider Vegabond a can’t-miss destination. You can stock up on snacks (I bought a bag of tofu jerky, the perfect sustenance option while traveling), buy a cruelty-free toiletry you might’ve forgotten, and get a tasty dessert or lunch in the same convenient location. Do note the hours, however: 11 am to 6 pm on most days, but noon to 5 on Sundays. Those Sunday hours tripped me up: I fully intended to swing by Vegabond en route to the train station on my last morning in the city to pick up some treats for Steven, but alas — it wouldn’t have opened in time. A crushing blow! (I had to settle for some accidentally vegan packaged stroopwafels I found at a little organic grocery store on my walk to the train station, but that was OK — they turned out to be extremely delicious.)

Amsterdam canal

Other options

There are plenty of places to eat vegan in Amsterdam, and of course I didn’t try them all. Here are a few that were on my list but never made the final cut.

  • Betty’s Restaurant: High-end vegetarian restaurant with a different three-course meal every day. Requires reservations; let them know you’re vegan ahead of time.
  • Deshima Lunchroom: Macrobiotic, vegan, and organic lunch counter.
  • DopHert: Vegan restaurant with breakfast, lunch, dinner, and lots of pastries. (I kept intending to make it here, but somehow never did!)
  • Koffee ende Koeck: All-vegan coffee and pastry shop that also offers a vegan high tea if booked in advance. (Now that I think about it, I really didn’t indulge in dessert in Amsterdam — I got so full from my meals that I never had room! I should have gone here and indulged in a sweets-only meal. Regrets!)
  • Restaurant Golden Temple: Vegetarian restaurant specializing in Indian food, but with lots of other influences on its cuisine. Many vegan options marked on the menu.
  • Vegan Junk Food Bar: Vegan restaurant specializing in fried food, including Dutch specialties such as bitterballen.

General tips

  • Like many European countries, Holland relies heavily on chip+PIN credit cards. Most eateries accepted my chip-only card; I just had to sign when using it. Some places don’t accept cash at all, including SLA (although I did see the cashier make an exception for an older man who didn’t seem to speak Dutch or English and couldn’t quite understand). Always check before you go!
  • There are a few Le Pain Quotidien locations around Amsterdam, including a few on the way to Amsterdam Centraal. I stopped on the way to the station one morning and picked up their vegan blueberry muffin (most locations always have the muffin in stock, and vegan options are marked with a little carrot icon). It was uninspired but sufficient for its purpose: a super-quick, reliably vegan option I could grab on the go.
  • EU law requires the labeling of 14 common allergens on both commercially packaged foods and restaurant menus. Since milk and eggs are included in that list, vegans can use those labels as a clue to whether a given item is vegan-friendly. It’s not a perfect system (honey could easily slip by unmarked), but it’s a good way to identify potentially vegan items and rule out options that are clearly unsuitable. (Note that I didn’t find this labeling particularly common on restaurant menus, although packaged food items did adhere to it.)

Amsterdam canal

* If I hadn’t been traveling alone, I  would have been more excited about the coffeeshops. But as a solo traveler who’s heard a few too many stories about unprepared tourists getting knocked on their butts by the strong strains of, ahem, coffee in Amsterdam, I didn’t want to risk it!


Eating vegan in Amsterdam // how to find vegan food in Amsterdam // Eating vegan in Amsterdam // how to find vegan food in Amsterdam //









Small-Bite Sundays: June 18, 2017

Small-Bite Sundays

Hello, all — I hope you’re well. Today I’m introducing a new feature on the blog, one that will let me share things that don’t merit a full blog post, but that I’d like to pass along anyway. (And, #realtalk, one that will hopefully encourage me to post a little more often.) I’m calling them “small bites” — small bites to read, to watch, to eat. Some of my favorite bloggers have a similar sort of weekly link-sharing post, and I always enjoy seeing what caught their eyes that week. Let me know what you think and whether there’s anything else you’d like to see.

But first, thank you all from the bottom of my sore heart for your kind words about Luna. It’s been two and a half weeks and, while we’ve certainly had time to take it in and grow a little more accustomed to her absence, I still have not-uncommon unthinking moments when I expect to see or hear her. When I pull into the driveway after work and head indoors to greet Steven, sometimes I briefly wonder, “Is she on the couch, or will she be waiting for me at the sliding door? Will I find any mukes on the floor?” before reality hits again. Reality has gotten a little less crushing, but still painful, and still a bit teary.

Luna lying in her cousin's bed

How could you not love this tiny face?

That said, we’ve been so touched by the memories shared by friends and family. One of the (major) perks of working at an animal-welfare organization is that nearly everybody understands the deep bond that exists between us and our beloved pets. On my first day back in the office (I worked from home for three days after Luna died and then was on vacation), I walked in to find three condolence cards jam-packed with messages from coworkers, a photo book with dozens of shots of sweet Tunie, and a note saying that they’d donated $250 to our local shelter’s senior dog fund in Luna’s honor. More tears.

Phew. Not all my Sunday posts will be quite so heavy, I promise. :) On to the small bites. I hope you enjoy.

Small bites: to read

This list of tips for solo travel, from one of my favorite travel bloggers. Have you ever traveled 100% alone? I just got back from my first wholly solo trip: nine days in Holland and Belgium (more on that soon). I took off for the trip just two days after losing Luna, and I was nervous that I wouldn’t be able to enjoy myself. But the chance to grieve in private, on my own terms and in my own way, was so worthwhile, and I loved being accountable to nobody but myself for how I spent my time. If you’re considering solo travel, I really recommend it. Amanda’s article is a great introduction to the concept, with some practical suggestions for how to plan your first solo jaunt.

This article about the tension between what tourists want when they visit Cuba and what actual Cubans want in their home country is a poignant reminder that enjoying a place because it’s rustic or gritty often comes at the expense of those who live there. Although tourists might lament the loss of classic cars and other markers of “authenticity” in Havana, actual Habaneros welcome and want change.

Small bites: to watch

This Daily Show interview with author Roxane Gay about her just-released memoir, Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body. Trevor Noah approaches the writer (and the book’s loaded and painful subject matter) with compassion, thoughtfulness, and not a trace of condescension. That’s a far cry from other outlets, including one that thought it was OK to reveal behind-the-scenes requests Gay made for her appearance on their podcast, and to talk about them in oddly precise detail. Anyway, I’m so looking forward to this book.

Small bites: to eat

This flavor-packed creamy garlic pasta with roasted cauliflower from Vegan Richa. I haven’t been very inspired to cook lately, but this recipe actually tempted me into the kitchen — and I’m so glad it did. The creamy, garlicky sauce sets off the spicy cauliflower to perfection. I didn’t have time to roast a whole head of garlic, so I just sautéed a few extra cloves and threw in a few shakes of Penzeys Roasted Garlic. I also used a pre-made Creole spice blend. Don’t neglect the lemon and parsley at the end, though! This recipe is going on my regular rotation for sure. I didn’t even mind blasting the oven on a 90˚ day for this one.

This blueprint for a killer bean salad from Hannah Kaminsky is just the thing to help you avoid a limp, watery, bland salad during your next cookout or picnic. Although Hannah also includes a few themed mixes (Mideast Feast; Spicy Southwestern), her basic version sounds like a no-fail option to please any palate.

This tofu fried egg sandwich (see photo below) served on carbolicious buttery Texas toast from Glory Doughnuts, a wonderful vegan doughnut and all-day-breakfast shop in quaint Frederick, Maryland. This small business often sells out of doughnuts by 11:00 AM on weekends, so when I woke up early this morning and felt like getting out of the house, we high-tailed it up to Frederick for brekkie. We also snagged three doughnuts (see below, again!) to munch later today: maple bourbon, the coconutty Chewbacca, and key lime pie.

Finally, happy Father’s Day to my wonderful and supportive dad — I know you’re reading! Love you.

Note: This post contains affiliate links. If you purchase something through my links, it costs nothing extra for you. I’m not looking to make a fortune, just to cover hosting costs. :)










Deer Run B&B Review: A Vegan Bed and Breakfast in the Florida Keys

I turned 30 in March. In August, my mom will turn 60. Two momentous birthdays in a single year required a special celebration: a mom-daughter vacation!

I asked my mom where she wanted to go, and after throwing around a few ideas, she was pretty decisive: the Florida Keys. She hadn’t been since her honeymoon 37 years ago, and I’d never been at all. I didn’t know much about the Keys beyond what I’d heard about Key West, but I was excited to explore both it and the less popular keys. And when we discovered that there was an all-vegan bed and breakfast on Big Pine Key, well, that sealed the deal. To the Keys!

Mom and me in Key West

Blurry Facebook photo of mom and me in Key West!

Deer Run Vegan B&B on Big Pine Key

Big Pine Key is 33 miles north of Key West, more than halfway down the stretch of 43 connected islands that make up the Keys. Besides hosting the only population of the diminutive Key Deer in the entire world (!), it also hosts a fabulous vegan B&B. Mom and I spent five nights at Deer Run Bed and Breakfast, enjoying the B&B’s private beach, astonishingly large and delicious breakfasts, and the occasional game of Scrabble when the weather didn’t cooperate.




Nothing like some RBG on the beach. 👌🏼👑 🌴

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Proprietors Jen and Harry have created a true vegan oasis in the Keys. Mom and I shared the Eden room, which might not be oceanfront but does have a private, secluded garden. The entire beach and yard is a wildlife-friendly habitat, and I loved having surprisingly good wildlife-watching right outside our screened-in porch. The redwing blackbird who was making a home for his family greeted us loudly every morning, the tiny lizards scurried through the trees, and I caught a glimpse of a shy resident iguana high-tailing it away from me when I walked around the corner one afternoon. The aforementioned endangered Key Deer (which grow only to about waist-height) roamed freely over the beach, and I couldn’t get enough of their tiny selves.



I'm pretty curious about you too, little one.

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Not only are Jen and Harry true-blue animal advocates (they’re both involved in all sorts of vegan and animal-friendly causes in the Keys), but they’re also environmentalists. To that end, Deer Run is kitted out to be super eco-friendly, with composting toilets, water-recycling systems, and compost bins for guests’ plant refuse. They also supply bulk shampoo, conditioner, soap, and body wash — no tiny plastic bottles here.

Out on the beach, Harry and Jen are working to restore and replant mangrove trees. They form a natural barrier against erosion but have typically been ripped out to make way for development and long stretches of sandy beaches.


View for the next five days.

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It’s good for the soul to stay in a place where the owners share your values and don’t compromise on them. Deer Run is that place.

Delicious vegan breakfasts at Deer Run

Deer Run is also the place to go if you want massive vegan breakfasts that feature multiple courses and take you at least an hour to eat. This is not an exaggeration, and I have to admit that I didn’t finish my breakfast even once during the five days we were there. (Don’t worry, plates and aluminum foil are at the ready so you can save your leftovers for later.)

At first, I wasn’t thrilled when I realized that the 8:30 breakfast call meant I’d have to get up early during my vacation. But it was totally worth it. It meant that Mom and I made the most of our days, and we started with super hearty breakfasts that kept us going. Plus, there’s copious coffee and tea if you need a caffeine kick!

Breakfasts typically included a baked good to start, followed by an incredible fruit smoothie, and then a ginormous main dish with fruit and another side. For example, one day we had almond scones, tropical smoothies, toasted oat waffles, and slices of cantaloupe. Another breakfast featured a to-die-for mocha muffin, a southwestern frittata, roasted potatoes, and a pineapple spear. And we had the absolute best vegan bacon I’ve ever tasted on our last day — I’m salivating just thinking about it!

Words not good enough? Check out the visuals.







See? I wasn’t joking about the ginormous breakfasts. You will leave full!

I can’t recommend this place highly enough. If you want a relaxing vacation where you’re immersed in gorgeous nature with wildlife all around, go. It’s pricy, but it’s worth it.


  • Be sure to visit nearby Bahia Honda Beach, located just a five-minute drive away. After driving past the entrance kiosk, turn left to hang out on a world-famous beach, or turn right for a chance to walk out on a portion of the old Key Highway system, which extends over the absurdly blue water and offers great views (photo below!).
  • Borrow a bike from Deer Run and take a ride to one of the nature trails on the island, or just cruise around enjoying the sun.
  • Order a custom-made key lime pie from Jen. It’s the only (!) vegan key lime pie in the Keys, and she’ll deliver it to you in a picnic basket with silverware, plates, and coconut whipped cream for your dining pleasure. Mom and I split one and finished it in two days. #noregrets
  • Be aware that the B&B attracts plenty of non-vegan guests, so you might have to field the standard “curious omnivore” questions. Think of it as an opportunity to educate and inspire!
  • Ask to meet the cats (if you’re not allergic, of course)! They’re sweet and super friendly but don’t interact with guests unless their presence is requested.

View from Bahia Honda

Pretty sure that’s a photo of paradise right there. ;)


Deer Run Vegan Bed and Breakfast //  Deer Run Vegan Bed and Breakfast //

Deer Run Vegan Bed and Breakfast // govegga.comDeer Run Vegan Bed and Breakfast // govegga.comDeer Run Vegan Bed and Breakfast // govegga.comDeer Run Vegan Bed and Breakfast // Deer Run Vegan Bed and Breakfast // govegga.comSave



Weekend Trip: Watkins Glen + Corning, New York, and the Ginger Cat B+B

Last March, Steven and I headed to New York State for a little getaway in advance of my 29th birthday — and I never shared the details. Shame! It was a fantastic weekend trip loaded with some of my favorite things, thanks to Steven’s careful planning.

I knew the general gist of our trip (a vegan B&B in New York State’s Finger Lakes region; a trip to the Pyrex exhibit at the Corning Museum of Glass) in advance, but not the details. And the details made this trip amazing.

Vegan Treats Bakery in Bethlehem, PA

We headed up to New York on a Friday evening, leaving after work and breaking up the six-ish hour drive with a stop at a store that’s been on my vegan bucket list for years: Vegan Treats. I think of it as the vegan baked goods mecca: if you’re a sugar-loving vegan, you need to visit at some point. (Or at the very least, try out its wares at select restaurants and VegFests on the east coast.)

Vegan Treats bakery in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania

If you visit, don’t let the unassuming location on a residential street fool you; this place is well worth a visit. Vegan Treats smells like an old-timey ice cream shop, and it’s chock-full of beautifully decorated delights. I could barely contain my excitement as I ogled the dozens of impeccably decorated sweeties.

I thought we were stopping to stock up on a few snacks for the weekend, but no: Steven had a surprise waiting for me. Check out my birthday cake:

Yes, that is a reproduction of my favorite Pyrex pattern (Butterprint) in cake form! The amazing artists at VT hand-painted this beauty at Steven’s request. It was almost too pretty to eat! (Rest assured, eat it we did — later.)

Cake (and additional treats) in hand, we set off for our final destination.

The Ginger Cat B&B in Watkins Glen, NY

The Ginger Cat is an all-vegan B&B, and it’s a gem of a place. It even won a VegNews award a few years ago, and rightfully so. Owner Gita has created a cozy, homey vegan sanctuary for visitors to the Empire State. She’s the perfect host, willing to take guests’ leads on whether they prefer solitude or camaraderie. We arrived late at night and let ourselves in, grateful for a warm bed in a quiet house.

Pig and pamphlets at the Ginger Cat B&B in Watkins Glen, NY

During our two-night stay, we enjoyed chatting with Gita, a dedicated vegan who seems to be a go-to source in Watkins Glen for establishments looking to provide vegan offerings. If you need a recommendation for food, wine, or anything, she’s got you covered. On Saturday night, we cut into the Pyrex cake and made sure to share a piece with Gita, who thoughtfully offered up some locally made vegan ice cream (!) for topping. The mint chocolate chip was amazing and paired beautifully with my vanilla amandine cake.  I’ll admit that I was a little skeptical when I realized that it wasn’t chocolate, but the vanilla amandine won me over at first bite. It’s a mature flavor, not overly sweet, but nuanced, and the cake had a layer of vanilla frosting to set it off. The texture was really special, too — almost like a sponge or an Angel food cake, with a little bit of a crust at the edges The whole cake was covered with vanilla fondant, and although I know some folks can’t stand the stuff, I personally love its chewy sweetness.

Back to the Ginger Cat! Of course, the second B in B&B stands for breakfast, and we breakfasted like royalty. I’ve never been to a B&B; it was SO nice to wake up and smell breakfast cooking! Gita cooked up a feast each morning. From soy-sauce braised kale with cashews to tender scones to a savory quiche to waffles with lots of maple syrup, we had lots to choose from each day, all washed down by freshly made coffee (her tea collection was also impressive).

Note that although Gita has a few friendly kitties living in the house, they stay in the residential area, not in the B&B section. Steven has a fairly sensitive cat allergy, but he wasn’t bothered by them. If you do want to meet the kitties, just ask — Gita will be happy to introduce you.

Corning Museum of Glass + Pyrex Exhibit

Steven chose this particular weekend for a reason: it was the last chance we’d get to see a Pyrex retrospective at the Corning Museum of Glass. My love of vintage Pyrex is undying and well-documented, and I loved this opportunity to learn more about the brand’s history and to see its evolution throughout the past century.

Although not particularly expansive, the Pyrex exhibit was exhaustive: it included examples of just about every Pyrex pattern available at any time in the brand’s history, along with a comprehensive history of the brand’s founding and evolution. We had the exhibit to ourselves when we visited, and it was fantastic to take in the beautiful patterns in peace.

Even though this particular exhibit was temporary, the Corning Museum of Glass is well-worth a visit regardless. I didn’t quite know what to expect, and I was blown away by the sheer size of the museum: multiple levels house a breathtaking display of glasswork throughout the ages, from ancient Rome to the Islamic world and right up to contemporary designers. Honestly, you could spend an entire day here learning about how glass has been made throughout the centuries and ogling the gorgeous work.

But CMOG really won a place in my heart as one of my favorite American museums because of the demonstrations. You can watch firsthand as a master glassworker creates a one-of-a-kind piece of artwork from start to finish. (And, if you’re lucky, you might be the lucky audience member who gets to take it home!) The museum offers four different demo sessions (hot glass, flameworking, optical fiber, and glassbreaking) and runs each one a few times a day. Attendance is included in the price of your admission ticket. We attended a hot glass and a flameworking demo, and I was super thrilled that both featured bad-ass lady glassworkers! The museum also offers classes in glassmaking, but those cost extra and probably need to be scheduled in advance.

City of Corning, NY

After your visit to the Museum of Glass, take a little time to wander around Corning! This sweet small town is perfect for walking — make sure you stop at the Corningware, Corelle & More Factory Outlet store for discounts on kitchen goods! You can also goofily pose with this absurd giant Pyrex measuring cup. Because why not.

Pyrex measuring cup in Corning, New York

Veraisons Restaurant

Trust me on this one: If you are in the area and want a nice evening out, make reservations at Veraisons Restaurant. The Finger Lakes are home to a robust wine scene, and Veraisons is the eatery attached to Glenora Cellars. You’ll have a gorgeous view of the vineyard as you sip locally made wine and nosh on — wait for it — a gourmet vegan cheese board.

Remember when I said that the purveyor of the Ginger Cat has some kind of uncanny influence on businesses in the area? Well, she’s made her mark here too, and the chef(s) at Veraisons offer a rotating selection of house-made vegan cheeses. The board comes with three cheeses (the menu currently lists brie, a rarebit-style soft white cheddar, and a mozzarella, although it was slightly different when we were there), along with grapes, bread, and a few other nibbles. We were blown away with how delicious and unique these cheeses were, and how wonderful it was to see “vegan cheese board” on a menu alongside a local (dairy) cheese sampler. I’m clearly the worst blogger in the world, because I neglected to photograph it, but TRUST ME ON THIS: it is worth your while (and your dollars).

This surprising creativity carried over into the rest of the menu too. Vegan options are clearly marked and abundant, from “fish” tacos to eggplant parm to braised chickpeas. Prices are on par with similar upscale-ish restaurants, and you’ll be voting with your dollar to encourage more vegan options at Veraisons.

Farm Sanctuary

Our single regret on this short visit to Watkins Glen was that we couldn’t visit Farm Sanctuary — it was too early in the season! But don’t worry, we’ll return — and we’ll make sure we can visit this beautiful place while we’re there.


Steven had one last birthday surprise in store for me during our drive back to Maryland from Watkins Glen: a stop in Scranton, PA. Why? Here you go:

Scranton sign from The Office

To see the original Scranton sign from The Office, duh! The sign has a permanent home in the Mall at Scranton, which you might know as the Steamtown Mall if you’re a fan of the show. Frankly, it’s a depressing place — one of those malls that’s failing to thrive, with more stores shuttered than open. A metaphor for dying industrial towns over the country, perhaps? Anyway, if you’re driving through and want a photo with a sign, it’s not a big detour. But don’t expect much entertainment at the mall!


  • …to the Ginger Cat B&B, ask owner Gita for recommendations for vegan eats in the area. Lots of veg-friendly visitors come to Watkins Glen to visit Farm Sanctuary, and local businesses seem more than willing to accommodate them. Gita will be in the know about the most up-to-date options!
  • …to the Corning Museum of Glass, check out the scheduled demos as soon as you arrive and plan your visit around them. I highly recommend attending at least one, if not more!
  • …to the general Watkins Glen/Finger Lakes region, check that Farm Sanctuary is open so you can schedule a visit. Going in the late spring will also be better if you intend to visit any of the local parks. (We didn’t have time for this, but these hikes look gorgeous!)


Vegan options for a weekend trip to Watkins Glen and Corning, New York







Vegans on a Plane: Turkish Airlines

Turkish Airlines is a great option for #vegan #travelers. #govegga

Last spring when I was planning Steven’s and my trip to Vienna and Prague, Turkish Airlines kept popping up with seriously unbeatable prices. (I think we ended up paying <$600 round trip from DC to Vienna.) Despite the rather long layover(s) at Istanbul’s Ataturk Airport, I ended up being glad we opted for Turkish — this is one airline that still treats its economy class passengers well. Here’s some of the special treatment you can expect on Turkish, even in economy:

  • Hot towels at the beginning and end of your flight
  • An amenity kit, including toothpaste, a toothbrush, an eye mask, slippers, and a few more doodads
  • Turkish Delights just after takeoff (this sweet is often vegan; not sure about the vegan-ness of the ones they serve)

Plus, they have more than respectable food! Turkish is well-known for having a bona-fide chef on board; although she/he primarily serves the business and first-class cabins, you’ll see her/him helping out during meal service in economy, too. I was extra impressed that they offered a full meal service on our relatively short flight from Istanbul to Vienna, meaning we arrived at our destination with full bellies. That’s always welcome!

One downside to booking on Turkish? You can’t reserve seats or request a special meal online. Instead, you’ll need to call their booking line ahead of your flight to make that happen. Every time I make the vegan food request, I always fear this is the time it fails and I’ll be left meal-less. Happily, that was not the case on these flights — although I was a little disappointed that the special meals aren’t delivered early, as is usually the case!

Here’s a sampling of what we ate on Turkish.

As you can see, the presentation was pretty standard for airplane fare. But nearly everything tasted pretty darn good. I most enjoyed the white beans in tomato sauce, that phyllo-wrapped savory pastry, and the fresh, piping hot bread.

So, the verdict? Vegan food on Turkish Airlines is tasty and plentiful. Now go ahead and book your flight!

Vegan on the Go: Cape Cod

Vegan on the Go: Eating #vegan on #capecod

Last month, my partner Steven headed north to Cape Cod to spend a week soaking up the sunshine with his mom. He kept me well-apprised of all the vegan food he found during his stay, and given the plentiful options available for veg-friendly folks, I knew I needed him to write up a review of everything he enjoyed on his trip. So, here it is: Steven’s report on where you can find vegan food in Cape Cod. All words and photos are Steven’s. 

(Side note — how sad is it that I grew up in Rhode Island but have never been to Cape Cod?! Yikes! Maybe next summer…?)

Pearl restaurant -- how to eat #vegan on #capecod.

Our first stop was Pearl, a classed-up beachside seafood place right near Mayo Beach. After verifying that the veggie burger was vegan, I ordered it with a side of hand-cut potato chips. The burger itself was nothing to write home about, and I erred in ordering it again on a return trip (even when I added the sriracha slaw). The hand-cut fries, on the other hand, were absolutely fabulous — piping hot, crispy, and nice and thick while still being wonderfully crunchy.

JD's Pizza -- how to eat #vegan on #capecod.
JD’s Wood Fired Pizza (aka JD’s Sports Bar)

Provincetown is probably the most veg-friendly town on the Cape, and my mom and I stopped by JD’s Wood Fired Pizza for lunch during our visit. I ordered the primavera pizza, which featured peppers, snow peas, zucchini, onion, summer squash, mushrooms, sundried AND cherry tomatoes, and a big old pile of arugula. I have a bad habit of always ordering Daiya on pizza when it’s available, and this veggie powerhouse definitely didn’t need it. Thankfully the chef had a light hand with it. The crust was crispy and delicious, and while I could have done with some tomato sauce, it was a great pizza.

Grab 'n Go -- how to eat #vegan on #capecod.

Grab ‘n’ Go Health Bar

“Vegan Soft Serve” was written on the sandwich board outside this shop, so I had to stop in. The only flavor was chocolate, and although it was not especially unique, I always appreciate vegan soft serve — and this one came with purple sprinkles!

Box Lunch -- how to eat #vegan on #capecod.

Box Lunch

Lunch in Wellfleet was a little tough to find, but I figured the Box Lunch sandwich shop would have something I could eat. One of the few options was the “Hum Vee,” a pretty standard wrap with hummus, tomatoes, avocado, sprouts, onions, and lettuce. Unfortunately the hummus was overly salty and there wasn’t much (if any) avocado to balance it out.

Van Rensselaer -- how to eat #vegan on #capecod.

Van Rensselaer’s

I wondered why I was the youngest person in the restaurant by about 30 years until I realized it was Early Bird dinner hours. Someone has clearly made an effort to be accommodating to vegans at Van Rensselaer‘s, as the restaurant offers an explicitly vegan fried rice bowl and a tofu provencal that can be made vegan. I got the latter along with a trip to the salad bar, which was decent — there was a kale salad that looked very out of place among the rest of the standard salad bar fare. The tofu provencal was unfortunately not as appetizing. There were zoodles for some reason, and the tofu had clearly not been prepared properly (it was limp and bland). I couldn’t resist the vegan peanut butter brownie for dessert, but it was unfortunately just as mediocre. Disappointing, given the prices here!

Joey's -- how to eat #vegan on #capecod.

Joey’s at Eat at the Fleet

Right off Route 6 is a little convoy of food trucks called Eat at the Fleet that includes Joey’s, a tex-mex truck with some solid veggie options. I got two chorizo tacos and shared some tortilla chips with my mom. The chorizo was quite good and uniquely flavored, if a little overly sweet, and the pico was awesome — the cashier told me it was from a local farm, and it certainly tasted fresh.


Green Lotus Cafe

I always have to get vegan Reubens when they are available. The one at Green Lotus was quite good, even if it wasn’t the best (that honor goes to the Reuben Royale at Liquid Earth in Baltimore). And their vegan clam chowder was awesome.



This very veg-friendly South African restaurant in Eastham was absolutely packed on a Saturday night. I started with the West African Peanut Soup, which I often make a quick and lazy version of at home. This one featured pumpkin and carrot in addition to peanut and was absolutely delicious. I also got the Vegan Bunny — apparently “bunny chow” is a South African street food that features curried meat or vegetables inside a loaf of bread. This was more of an open-faced sandwich, with flavorful and savory curried veggies, a pile of delicious sweet potato fries, and two buns in there somewhere.

Shoreline Diner -- how to eat #vegan on #capecod.

Shoreline Diner

Whenever Kelly and I drive up to Rhode Island to visit her family, we see the sign for Shoreline Diner — but it’s always past midnight and we can never make the time to stop. On this trip I vowed I would make it. On the drive over I deliberated for awhile between a breakfast dish (Berries and Cream French Toast) and something more savory, and in the end decided on the Tempeh BLT Club. Crisp, flavorful, and filling, this sandwich included both tempeh and veggie bacon. I was in protein heaven.

MIchael Angelo -- how to eat #vegan on #capecod.

Michael Angelo

There’s apparently a thing in Connecticut called Salad Pizza. When my cousin told me he was ordering pizza from Michael Angelo, I responded in the classic vegan way — “Don’t worry if the pizza isn’t vegan, I’ve got leftovers, I don’t want you all to have to go out of your way.” Of course, they responded like family should, by calling to check that the pizza was vegan and making a delicious salad, fresh salsa, and guac for sides. Salad pizza is, much like it sounds, is simply a chef salad dumped on top of a pizza. It’s very strange and very good, and never comes with cheese anyway, so I didn’t have to feel bad about depriving them.


Vegan food in Cape Cod // govegga.comVegan food in Cape Cod //