Vegan in Montréal, Canada | Three Days in Montréal at Christmastime

Despite growing up just 300 miles from the Canadian border, I somehow made it 31 years without visiting our friendly neighbor to the north. Shame! It wasn’t because I didn’t think Canada was a worthy destination; I’ve seen enough jaw-dropping photos of friends on hikes in Banff to know that Canada’s got plenty to offer. But I’ve always kept the Great White North in my back pocket, so to speak: Ontario and Québec are close enough that I could take a quick flight for a long weekend, so I’ve never really prioritized traveling there, opting for the excitement of an overseas trip instead.

You can see where this is going, of course: I finally pulled this reserve destination out of my pocket and booked a trip last December, thanks in part to a great deal I found via my beloved Scott’s Cheap Flights. The timing was serendipitous; I’d realized Steven and I wouldn’t be able to swing a December trip to Europe to enjoy some Christmas markets, and then, voilà: cheap flights to Montréal, a Francophone city with a dash of European charm and its own festive Christmas markets. Sold!

We packed all sorts of fun into our three-day trip to Montréal. The weather was frigid, not even hitting 10˚F on our first two days, but we layered and bundled up and found it wholly manageable. (I like to think my days in Minnesota and Wisconsin prepared me!) Plus, the chilly weather made it all the more reasonable for us to spend, say, two hours drinking tea and dining on delicacies! Here are some highlights of our all too brief visit.

Stuffing our faces with poutine at La Panthère Verte

By the time we checked into our hotel late one Friday afternoon, we were getting hungry. We pulled up the Google map I’d made of vegan eats in Montréal, suited up for a night of walking in the bitter cold, and headed out for a requisite Montréal meal: poutine!

Vegan poutine at Le Panthère Verte in MontréalWe opted to get ours at La Panthère Verte, a small vegan chain with six locations in Montréal. We opted for the Rue Saint-Denis location, which was about a 15-minute walk from our hotel. La Panthère Verte is fast-casual, so you order at the front and then take your seat. We opted to split a large (“duo”) bowl of poutine, and Steven got a side of lentil soup as well. We also each wanted a beer, so we placed our order at the front and were told to wait a couple minutes; the cashier would meet us at the bar (located closer to the front of house) to pour them. We settled into our seats and waited, but eventually had to get up and ask about the beers again because the front-of-house staff seemed to have forgotten. Not a big deal by any means, but I did wonder why the restaurant was so sparsely staffed on a Friday night!

Beers and food in hand, we ate. Neither of us had realized that the poutine would be served with sweet potato fries, and I’ll admit that we were a little disappointed not to get the true poutine experience. Still, the salty, tofu-based curds were surprisingly cheese-like, with a texture that actually did remind me of the one time I tried legit cheese curds ages ago. We shoveled forkfuls (forksful?!) of gravy-covered fries and tofu into our welcoming gullets and found it a satisfactory experience. The fries were a little mushy by the end, though, and I suspect regular fries would’ve stood up to the onslaught of gravy a bit better. I took the lion’s share of the poutine, as Steven also had his lentil soup — a warm, gently spiced affair perfect to take off the chill.

Post-poutine, we decided to get drinks — but not at Le Panthère Verte. The atmosphere at this location didn’t quite seem conducive to leisurely sipping cocktails, and the plate-glass storefront let in quite a chill. I wanted somewhere warm, and we opted for L’Gros Luxe, a local chain of hipster-perfect bars. Steven sipped a whiskey, I had an Old Fashioned, and we sat at the bar as the tables behind us slowly filled with coworkers and friends gathering for a holiday cookie exchange. Inveterate people-watcher though I am, I prefer to to watch from the periphery — not enveloped by the group. We soon made our escape.

Enjoying a quick vegan breakfast at Copper Branch

Here is an amazing fact about Montréal: Not only is the aforementioned Le Panthère Verte a fully vegan chain, but this freakin’ city has a SECOND vegan chain! Copper Branch also has locations in Toronto and Québec City, but for our purposes, the dozen or so locations in Montréal made it simple to find a quick vegan breakfast en route to Mont Royal.

Straight-on shot of a wrap filled with tofu scramble, tomato, and lettuce.Copper Branch focuses on healthy, organic, and often gluten-free plant-based dishes, including all-day breakfast items. In the mood for something warm (rather than one of the billion smoothie/grain bowls on offer), Steven and I both chose the Southwest Wrap Scramble, featuring tofu scramble, vegan cheese, veggies, and a spicy sauce. It was, in a word, fine. Nothing spectacular, and a bit drippy for my tastes, but adequate. I didn’t love — or, frankly, understand— the inclusion of lettuce in a hot wrap. Who wants to bite into warm, wilted lettuce? Why not add a heartier green instead?! That said, I liked the generous portion of tofu scramble, which helped to power Steven and I through an energy-requiring (yet ultimately abortive) attempt to summit Mont Royal.

Steven got a hot coffee on the side, while I chose a matcha coconut latte. It was nice and hot and didn’t skimp on the matcha, even if it was a bit overly sweetened for my tastes.

Failing to reach the top of Mont Royal

Mont Royal, you tricksy devil. Lured by promises of the best view in the city, Steven and I huffed and puffed our way up dozens of wooden staircases set into the hills until we found ourselves on Mont Royal proper. We’d plugged the Mont Royal chalet — from which one could enjoy that spectacular view — into our offline Google map, but ended up following posted signage toward it instead. As we set off, we spotted even more wooden staircases leading up to a viewpoint, but they were chained off by very official-looking signage that seemed to promise falls and grievous injury if you ignored them. We watched as more than a few fellow hikers clambered over the chains, ignoring the signage completely, but we figured a more leisurely stroll up to the chalet via this alternate route (no more stairs!) would get us there eventually.

A snowy path through some trees.

This is very much not a scenic overlook. Alas.

Alas, it did not. We walked and walked, following the signage until it… stopped. We checked our Google map, which showed the chalet somewhere back behind us, closer to where we’d come from. Plus, we had definitely not ascended high enough to reach any kind of spectacular viewpoint. With a 1:00 p.m. lunch reservation looming, we turned around. The downhill walk went faster, and we marveled at the many hardy runners making their way up the hill, braving the icy temperatures and lots of actual ice. Soon we were back at the chained-off staircase, which we suspect would’ve taken us right to the chalet. Without time to make the trek up, we cursed ourselves for not hopping the chain in the first place and set off north of Mont Royal to make our afternoon tea reservation.

Frankly, I’m still salty that we didn’t get to the chalet. We briefly considered making a second attempt later in the afternoon, post-tea, but the rapidly setting sun and our increasingly frozen fingers dissuaded us. We still had a nice hike in the bright winter sun, and it gives us a reason to return to Montréal. We’ve got to experience the city in the warmer months, right?

Vegan afternoon tea at Le Parloir in Montréal, CanadaEnjoying vegan afternoon tea at Le Parloir

Our three-course afternoon tea was the perfect antidote to the failed Mont Royal attempt. With chilled digits to warm and bruised egos to salve, we happily spent a good two hours sipping on hot tea, working our way through a dozen or so small bites, and eavesdropping on our fellow diners’ conversations. I heartily recommend this experience, and you can read a much more detailed account here.

Soaking up the holiday magic at a Christmas market

Oh, friends. Let me tell you a minor tale of woe. Recall how, when planning this trip to Montréal, my primary motivation was to enjoy the city’s festive Christmas markets. Early research showed at least two promising markets, but then, in early December, tragedy struck: While finalizing my plans for the trip, I discovered that one of the markets had been canceled for the 2018 season. Needless to say, I felt this tragic blow deep in my holiday-loving heart. Clearly the Grinch was at work here.

Steven en route to a Christmas market in MontréalBut! All was not lost. There was still one Montréal Christmas market scheduled, and we made our way there on Saturday night. We availed ourselves of the metro; Montréal has a $10 24-hour pass that includes transportation to the airport, so we timed the purchase to take advantage of that boon. A brief journey later, we exited the Atwater station to a Christmas miracle: SNOW! Perfect light flakes floating down around as as we walked just a few blocks to the Village de Noel de Montréal. Our route took us through an expansive lot selling Christmas trees; I forced Steven to pose among the snow-dappled pines for a photo. It was — not to put too fine a point on it — festive as fuck.

Christmas market in MontréalA few minutes later, we entered the market proper. It was a compact affair, with just the right number of people: enough for it to feel festive, but not quite packed enough to trigger much crowd-induced anxiety. Two or three rows of vendors (all cozy in little chalets) sold everything from socks to snacks, and we made sure to stop for glasses of vin chaud — served, as I’d desperately hoped they’d be, in commemorative cups. Not the fancy ceramic mugs I’ve seen doled out at European markets, but light little plastic numbers that we brought home as our only souvenirs of the trip. Hot mulled wine in hand, we meandered over to the chest-high tables, where you could lean in and sip your wine while being warmed by the fire pits at the tables’ center. We petted a few jauntily be-sweatered dogs, watched a vendor serve up raclette, and generally enjoyed the merry ambiance… all to the tune of Die Hard dubbed in French. Apparently the Christmas village shows movies some nights on a big outdoor projector, and speakers placed throughout the village let everyone hear the film, even if they weren’t watching it. Rapid machine gun fire — so festive! (In all seriousness, it was a little unnerving. The speakers weren’t terribly loud, and you couldn’t hear them from every part of the market, but I wondered if maybe this wasn’t the best movie to pipe out, context-less, in a crowd.)

My only regret from the Christmas market (well, aside from failing to get a cute photo together) is not trying maple syrup snow candy. Ever since reading about this delicacy in a Little House book ages ago, I’ve been enamored with it: You pour heated maple syrup on fresh snow, twirling it as you go, to create what’s essentially maple taffy. As a certified maple lover, it’s a dream food for me — but I’ve never seen it being made before. And then, there it was: a maple syrup snow candy vendor, twirling hot syrup into a sweet delight for just $1. BUT. I did not have any cash on me. In a truly boneheaded move, we didn’t withdraw any Canadian cash from an ATM before heading to the market. And I call myself a seasoned traveler. :( Needless to say, I was crushed not to finally try this most quaint of Canadian treats.

Anyway. We spent a good hour at the market, then headed back to the city center to stuff our faces with sushi.

Enjoying roll after roll of vegan sushi

My preparation for traveling tends to be pretty passive: I peruse blog posts and Pinterest for inspiration, putting together a personalized Google map of vegan eateries, hotspots, accommodations, etc. Steven took a more active route for this trip: He posted in the vegan Montréal subreddit asking for recommendations. One spot was mentioned repeatedly: Sushi Momo Montréal, an all-vegan sushi joint on trendy Rue Saint-Denis.

Sushi Momo MontréalSteven and I had visited another vegan sushi spot previously — Pirata in Vienna — but I’ve got to say that Sushi Momo blew Pirata out of the, ahem, water. Not only is the vibe super inviting and fun, with little booths tucked into every available space and all sorts of eye-catching decor, but the food is incredible. These sushi rolls are not your run-of-the-mill veg option, with avocado/cucumber/carrot/blah. We started with edamame (duh) and then moved onto a five-piece Momo roll (sweet Japanese tofu, avocado, mango, cucumber, tempura, oba leaf, Japanese curry aioli, basil-miso emulsion) and a five-piece tempura Dino-Dino roll (baby spinach maki, cucumber, avocado, inari, mushrooms cooked in sake, truffle-miso emulsion, wasabi emulsion, teriyaki sauce, ito-togarashi).

Apologies for the crappy photo (the lighting was tricky), but I hope you can see how beautifully these rolls were presented — especially the Momo roll in the background. I am not a sushi connoisseur by any stretch of the imagination, but even I could tell that this was really damn good sushi. Every ingredient was balanced by another one, creating a perfectly harmonious bite with something to hit nearly all the basic tastes and requiring just the smallest bit of soy sauce to bring it all together. Each bite had a blend of textures to keep things interesting, and I truly wished I could’ve expanded my stomach to try more. We did end up ordering a third roll, the name of which I cannot recall.

I can’t recommend Momo Sushi highly enough. Our experience was perfect all around, from the moment we arrived early for our reservation (oops) and were seated anyway to the bustling yet inviting ambiance. It’s definitely quite a hipster-friendly place, but the service was great and the food was even better. If we ever up sticks and move to Montréal, rest assured that the existence of Momo Sushi will have played a not-insubstantial role in that decision. I dare you to read through the menu and not end up salivating.

Stuffing our faces at brunch

A white marble table piled with a plate of pancakes, a tureen of sliced sausages, a bowl of hash browns, and a plate with an omelette on it.Our streak of delicious meals continued on our final day, when we enjoyed brunch at Lov. (It was a vegetarian restaurant when we visited but has recently gone fully vegan!) The combination of rumbling bellies and a favorable exchange rate inspired us to order way more food than we usually do: an omelette for Steven, gorgeous fruity pancakes for me, and sausages and hash browns to share. Yum. My gluten-free (!) pancakes were sweet and tasty and topped with chai cashew cream and berries; the savory sausages and hash browns balanced them out nicely and provided me with some protein. I recall Steven’s omelette being decent, if not outstanding, and quite filling.

The interior of Lov, with whitewashed brick walls, hanging wicker chairs, and rattan light fixtures.If you can’t tell from the photos, Lov has a very curated aesthetic, all white marble and exposed brick and natural materials. It works quite well, with lots of natural light creating a welcoming space. It’s definitely trendy (just look at all the light fixtures in the photos of the interior), but hey, if it gets people in the door and eating vegan food, I’m not complaining.

Feeling festive in Old Montréal

A wide brick alleyway with glowing holiday lights, green pine garlands, and a generally festive atmosphere.Although much of the picturesque Old Montréal district was under construction when we walked through it, we did manage to find some festive little nooks, crannies, alleyways, and storefronts!

The ridiculously adorable Maison Pepin alleyway functioned as a kind of mini Christmas market, with lots of greenery and natural decor on offer both outside and in the shop proper. It’s basically an Instagrammer’s dream, too, with plenty of opportunities for oh-so-festive holiday selfies. I can’t even be mad about it, though; it’s too freakin’ cute!

Other options

I’m glad we had three days to eat our way through Montréal, but I wish we’d had more! Here are some spots we didn’t get to try.

  • Sophie Sucrée, a vegan bakery that serves up some truly beautiful pastries.
  • Invitation V, a modern-looking bistro with cuisine from many cultures.
  • Lola Rosa, another internationally inspired café with an impressive menu. Serves brunch. Another spot to get vegan poutine in Montréal!

This is not an exhaustive list, for Montréal is incredibly vegan-friendly. Let me know your favorite spots!

Small-Bite Sundays: Pancakes and Cozy Winter Reads (12/8/19)

Small-Bite Sundays -- winter

IT’S BAAACK! My Small-Bite Sundays series, in which I indulge in some old-timey blogging and share whatever I feel like sharing. I’m not sure why I abandoned this practice back in 2018, but I realized that it dovetails perfectly with my approach to VeganMoFo this year (low-pressure rambling, basically). So! I intend to get back into the small-bite spirit in the months ahead. I probably won’t post every weekend, but hopefully it’ll help me retain some of the happy blogging momentum I gathered during MoFo.

Right now I’m looking at the photo I chose for that graphic above, and I’m wishing we’d get some snow here in Maryland. It’s been cold lately, but we’ve yet to see the flakes fly. (Well, apparently that’s not entirely true: I was in Puerto Rico at the end of October/beginning of November for work, and on the day I flew home, Steven texted me in the morning to say it was snowing (no accumulation, just flakes). Leaving the gorgeous hot and sunny weather of Puerto Rico for the chill of Maryland was… rough.) Now we’re in full-on holiday mode, and I wouldn’t mind a nice snowstorm. Ah well.

Small bites to read, winter edition

I’m dedicating the month of December to lighthearted reads only! As I do every year, I set myself a reading goal for 2019: This year, 85 books. I’m one away from finishing! I’ve read quite a lot of nonfiction this year, and to be honest, some of those reads are still weighing on me.

In particular, I can’t stop thinking about Darcy Lockman’s All the RageI haven’t even been able to write up my Goodreads review for it yet, because there’s so much I want to say. Lockman writes about the way even the most egalitarian (hetero) partnerships tend to fall back into gendered roles when children enter the picture, and the stats are bleak. She explores the (many!) reasons why this happens, but it’s a tough, painful read. Steven and I have worked hard to cultivate a partnership based on equality, and I’ve always just assumed that equality would continue if/when we have children. Lockman’s research shows that we’ll have to work really damn hard to make that happen, though. I absolutely recommend this book if you’re at all interested in this topic, but be warned that it’s a tough read. I had to take frequent breaks — I even returned it to the library and then checked it out again later! — because it was really bumming me out.

…which brings me to my December reading goals. :) I’m focusing on lighthearted, cozy reads for this month, because I deserve it! Right now I’m reading Graham Norton’s Holding. Yes, that Graham Norton! While browsing the stacks at my beloved local library a few weeks ago, I noticed his name on the spine and was immediately curious — I didn’t know Norton was a fiction writer! When I realized Holding is a mystery set in a small Irish town, I added the book to my quickly growing stack. Turns out Norton is quite a good writer, wry and charming and focused on the minutiae of small-town life in a way that reminds me of J.K. Rowling’s non-Harry Potter fiction. This is a more than respectable debut novel! It’s a quick read, but enjoyable if you like light mysteries (and/or small Irish towns).

(Also, quick note — if you use Goodreads, add me as a friend!)

Small bites to eat, winter edition

A slightly skewed top-down view of a kitchen table loaded with food and plates.Thanksgiving dinner! My brother and sister-in-law visited from Seattle for the holiday, and we had quite a nice, low-key Thanksgiving. We had a Gardein roast, stuffing, roasted Brussels sprouts, mashed potatoes, gravy, and a gingery sweet potato mash. Our friend Sara brought over a delicious cranberry sauce she’d made, which featured chunks of apples and oranges and was topped with pecans. For dessert, we had apple pie, cranberry-orange bread, and pumpkin pie (the classics). This year I tried Bryanna Clark Grogan’s pumpkin pie filling, and it got rave reviews. I used canned coconut milk and upped the spices, and I also used my pecan-date crust because my sister-in-law is avoiding wheat at the moment.

As an appetizer, I picked up a bunch of fancy olives from Wegmans’ deli bar. They have a seriously impressive selection, with literally dozens of varieties of stuffed olives, oil-packed peppers, and more. Perfect for an antipasto platter.

A small blue plate with a stack of pancakes, topped with a deep red fruit compote.In non-Thanksgiving eats, I made Isa’s Puffy Pillow Pancakes for breakfast this morning. <3 They are always a win! I added cinnamon (because, duh) and topped them with a fruit compote. That was another win. We had a team holiday party at work this week, and about half the fruit tray was left uneaten. It sat in abandoned the fridge for a few days, and I decided to bring it home on Friday because it would otherwise get tossed by the cleaners. Soft, squishy, slightly overripe fruit is not the best for eating raw, but cooked down into a compote with a bit of sugar, water, vanilla, and lime juice, it made for a perfect pancake topping. Food waste win!

~~~

What have you been reading and eating this week?

(FYI, this post contains affiliate links!)

Cacao Tea Review: A Caffeine-Free, Chocolate-y Treat

A glass mug full of cacao tea. In the background is a packet from Cacao Tea Co.I’m a devoted fan of hot beverages, and I’ve got a tea chest to prove it. Loose-leaf and bagged, black and green and herbal… it’s all there. What I had never tried until a few months ago, however, was cacao tea. Record scratch.

I’ve had so-called “chocolate teas” in the past, but they invariably left me disappointed. Generally speaking, I like rich, bold, dark chocolate, which is almost impossible to taste in a tea. Instead, most chocolate-based tea blends have a stronger chocolate aroma than actual flavor, leaving me disappointed and wondering why I didn’t just make hot cocoa instead.

So when the kind folks at Cacao Tea Co. reached out to me a few months back and asked whether I’d like to try some of their thoughtfully crafted cacao husk tea, it didn’t take more than a few minutes of browsing their website before I responded with an enthusiastic, “Yes, please!” After a phone call with Jessica — the company’s founder — I was even more excited to try it. Here’s why.

Top-down image of cacao tea in a glass mug.

  • It’s naturally caffeine-, gluten-, and sugar-free. Although I love (love) coffee and the comforting ritual of drinking it, it doesn’t exactly love me. I’m sensitive to caffeine and quickly get addicted, which is not a state in which I want to remain! I also can’t drink anything caffeinated in the evening without suffering the (sleepless) consequences. Cacao tea is a great alternative.
  • It’s ethically sourced. Y’all know I had to ask Jessica about this, and she assured me that her company takes care to source their cacao from suppliers who pay farmers more than a living wage.
  • The company donates 15% of its profits to charity. Specifically, to charities that provide meals to families in underserved communities in developing countries.
So, what is cacao tea?

It’s simply the husks left over after cocoa beans are harvested and the nibs are removed. You can brew the husks to make a chocolate-y, tea-like beverage.

How do you make cacao tea?

However you want! I tried it three ways: steeped in a tea strainer, brewed in a French press, and boiled on the stove for 5-7 minutes. The latter is my favorite method because it creates a nicely concentrated and rich drink, but the French press method is my go-to when I make it at work.

What does cacao tea taste like?

Like chocolate! OK, maybe not like hot cocoa, but like a rich and pure form of chocolate. Not bitter, but deep and nuanced. I was surprised by how much I enjoyed the flavor! It was much better than those tepid “chocolate teas” that have disappointed me time after time.

When I spoke with Jessica, she called Cacao Tea Co. her passion project, and her love for the product was obvious. I’m so glad she reached out to me, and I’m glad I’ve added a new, caffeine-free hot drink to my repertoire. Up next? Experimenting with it! You can use a concentrated version of the tea in baked goods, which is obviously quite appealing to me. I’ve got a few other ideas I’d like to try, too… a cacao-oat milk latte? Cacao sorbet? Cold-brew cacao?! Actually, scratch those last two… I’m sticking with hot drinks only as the winter approaches. :)

Although this cacao tea was provided to me for free, this review is 100% my unbiased opinion. I only accept review products that align with my ethics, and I always note when I’m reviewing a product I did not purchase myself. (See more here.)

Cooking from Cans: Pigeon Peas and Coconut Rice

How often do you use the recipes on the boxes and cans in your pantry? I don’t do it very often. But as I was poking through my stash of canned beans, I noticed an appealing recipe on a can of coconut milk: Gungo (Pigeon) Peas and Rice. I had a can of pigeon peas; I obviously had the coconut milk; I had rice… so why not try it?!

In retrospect, choosing to make this rather heavy dish — which required 45 minutes on the stovetop (with me stirring and testing the rice frequently) and which is best eaten hot — on an 83˚F day was perhaps not my finest move. I blame my caffeine-addled brain; slightly jittery from too much cold brew and too few carbs, I clearly lacked some key critical thinking skills. No matter; a little sweat never hurt anyone. Anyway, this came together relatively easily in one pot and required minimal dishes  for preparation — just a cutting board, a can opener, and a measuring cup for the water/broth and the rice. The result? Not bad! Perhaps a little simplistic in flavor, but it’s probably because I had to make quite a few substitutions. Specifically, I:

  • Used brown rice in place of “Grace Rice,” which I can only assume is white rice.
  • Replaced the escallion (!) with a few rather anemic scallions I’ve been regrowing in water for a few weeks.
  • Opted for dry thyme rather than fresh, because I didn’t have fresh.
  • Used garlic-ginger paste rather than fresh garlic and ginger, because I was lazy.
  • Added a teaspoon of dried allspice rather than pimento berries (!).
  • Used a mysterious hot pepper (grown from seeds my dad bought in India!) rather than the Scotch bonnet.

So, yes. Given that rather extensive list of substitutions — most of which replaced flavorful fresh ingredients with, um, less flavorful and less fresh ingredients — it’s no surprised that my rice wasn’t terrifically flavorful! It was not bad at all, though, especially when I added some lime juice. (It was missing an acidic element, in my opinion!)

For the curious, the recipe is here. I also recommend scrolling through the Grace Foods produce list — I enjoyed seeing all the Jamaican and Caribbean favorites, especially this amusingly-named “Grace Food Drink.”

(If you’re curious, here’s the “chicken” broth I used (affiliate link!). Better than Bouillon is killer!)

Silver Diner Review | Vegan Options at Silver Diner

When I first moved to Maryland seven (!!!) years ago, I was delighted to discover a local diner chain with vegan options. Back then, Silver Diner had a location at the mall near my office, and it was a not-infrequent destination for celebratory team lunches. The options were good and creative, too, more than just your average portobello burger or veggie wrap. Unfortunately, the mall location closed years ago, and I haven’t really been to a Silver Diner since.

This year, though, Silver Diner has upped its vegan options game, introducing a Just Egg Benedict, adding the Beyond Burger, and offering an entire section of vegan entrées. So when a (vegan!) friend suggested we head to the location in Frederick as part of her low-key birthday celebration, Steven and I thought that sounded like a perfect idea.

After much deliberation, I ordered the cauliflower mac and cheese, which features tempeh bacon, roasted tomatoes, asparagus, and a cheesy sauce served over cauliflower and zucchini… all topped with Beyond Meat meatballs. An unexpected combo, to be sure, and not only because there’s no pasta in this mac and cheese. I was dubious, but hopeful. Local vegan restaurant Great Sage has an outstanding mac and cheese that includes both pasta and big chunks of cauliflower, and I’ve often pondered ordering that dish sans pasta, but with added cauliflower.

Alas, Silver Diner’s take on cauli mac and cheese couldn’t live up to Great Sage’s classic version. Instead of big, toothsome cauliflower florets, the cauli, tomatoes, and zucchini are finely chopped, mixed with nearly undetectable  bits of tempeh bacon, and stirred up with a Chao- and nooch-based cheesy sauce. In fact, I wouldn’t even call it a sauce, because it was indiscernible from the rest of the dish’s elements (as I’m sure is obvious from the photo).

To be fair, it all tasted pretty good (if a bit overly herby). The Beyond Meat meatballs were tender and flavorful, and the asparagus was cooked just right. But to call this a mac and cheese is, frankly, absurd. Call it a stew, maybe, or a cauliflower “rice” dish, but not mac and cheese. It irks me that Silver Diner is presenting this as a vegan take on mac and cheese when our mac and cheeses are not generally pasta-free! If any curious omnivore were to order this, I fear they’d be quite disappointed. It felt like a dish that just wasn’t well conceptualized. Why are there meatballs served on top?! That’s not a feature of mac and cheese. Nor are roasted tomatoes. It’s just bizarre.

On the bright side, the side of fries we ordered for the table to share were absolute perfection, the perfect combo of crispy, salty, slightly herby goodness, and my dining companions enjoyed their dishes (Beyond Burgers and Just Egg Benedicts). And afterward, we got to hang out with Maggie: always a good time.

Bits ‘n Bobs ‘n Buffalo Cauliflower

Hello, hello, hello!

While I haven’t exactly missed the daily MoFo blogging, I have missed feeling connected to my blogger pals. All the more incentive to keep up a semi-regular posting schedule, right?! (It also doesn’t hurt that I’m still catching up on MoFo posts, yikes.) And so: My first foray into non-MoFo casual diary-style blogging. It feels weird. I still feel like I need a “point” to my posts, a recipe to share or a restaurant to review. And I do have a few of those in the works: an extremely overdue post about my trip to Copenhagen last March (!!!), a review of a vegan-friendly local diner, etc. But for now, something much simpler. :)

We kicked off September with Labor Day weekend. Three-day weekends are just so magical! I had a pretty great one, full of fun knitting and good food and a nice solo hike, where I spotted this tree with a little heart motif. I agree, tree. I heart being outdoors too. On Sunday morning I whipped up a tasty (if monotone) breakfast: tofu scramble, home fries, and a kiwi. It’s much healthier than that bland palette suggests! I used this tofuevos recipe, which is my absolute favorite bare-bones (i.e., no veggies) scram. I always reduce the soy sauce, though, because two tablespoons is just too much. A half tablespoon is perfect, plus a little sprinkling of black salt for some eggy flavor.

What else, what else… I haven’t been photographing my dinners, partially because MoFo is over but also because the sun is setting earlier. :( Ugh, autumn. Please stay away! I did snap a quick pic of this buffalo cauliflower and tofu I made last night. I used Chocolate Covered Katie’s baked buffalo cauliflower recipe as a template, with some modifications: I doubled the cauliflower to a whole head, added a block of pressed firm tofu, and switched up the sauce a bit (1/3 cup of Frank’s Red Hot plus two tablespoons of vegan butter). It was spicy enough for me! I served it with some homemade vegan ranch and fresh raw veggies. (About that vegan ranch: It’s mayo-based and so simple! I omitted the raw garlic and instead used a few cloves from this amaaazing garlic confit I made last weekend.) This is a dinner that feels indulgent but is actually decently healthy, with lots of protein (half a block per person!) and plenty of veggies (~half a head of cauliflower, plus pepper and carrots on the side). Yes, please.

I’ve also been enjoying the fruits (…veggies…) of my gardening labor, as I mentioned in my recent MoFo post. Today I picked a couple handfuls of cherry tomatoes, a few carrots, and LOTS of those fun little sour gherkins. So colorful! The tomatoes went right into a panzanella salad, along with some rosemary-garlic sourdough squares, basil, green pepper, and a garlic-lemon dressing.

And finally, here’s a sweet shot of Maggie (formerly Margaret), a hound mix we fostered for six months (!) last year. She was adopted by our close friends about six months ago, which is amazing: She gets spoiled to within an inch of her life by our friends, and we get to see her frequently! We hung out with Maggie and her canine and feline brothers on Saturday night while celebrating our friend Rachel’s birthday, so we made sure to snag some cuddle time on the couch. This girl is incredibly sweet and goofy, and it’s absolutely wonderful to see her enjoying life in her forever home. <3

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Long Weekend Eats | VeganMoFo 2019 Day Thirty-One

And here we are: the final day of MoFo! If my goal with this return to diary-style blogging was to (1) make MoFo enjoyable again, and (2) evoke the simple pleasures of simple blogging (i.e., what I experienced in Days of Yore), I’m glad to say I’ve succeeded on both fronts. Are these posts particularly memorable? Nah. Did I produce ~*~solid content~*~ that will ~*~drive traffic~*~ to my blog? LOL, no. Did I enjoy myself? I sure did!

So, what did I get up to on this final day of August — and the first day of a long weekend? Well, I started off with my new favorite breakfast. I often rely on oatmeal or overnight oats, but earlier this week, I made something different before heading to work. I mixed up oats, oat milk, a little agave nectar, and some coconut flakes, and ate it all as-is. No heating; no overnight soaking. “Wow,” I thought. “This is good! Lightly soaked oats with fun add-ins, how novel!” And then I realized… oh yeah. I’m eating muesli. Haaaa. I returned to this newly discovered — yet well-known — brekkie this morning, right before I headed off to a volunteer assignment with two hospice patients. I used oats, oat milk, peach slices, coconut flakes, and a little sprinkle of cinnamon sugar. Perfection!

Post-volunteer assignment, I took a quick trip to the farmers market for the weekly shop. (My assignment happened to be at an assisted living facility right next to the market.) My favorite stall wasn’t there, though — one of the owners had passed away. :( They had a chair set up in their usual spot with a sign informing patrons what had happened, along with details about the funeral. Super sad.

A little later, Steven and I decided to spend some time outside at Paladar, a rum bar and self-described “Latin kitchen.” I had a gift card I wanted to use up, so we figured we’d take advantage of the mild weather (well, low 80s…) and sit outside on their dog-friendly patio. Naturally we brought Rosie, who did not seem to enjoy it quite as much as we did. She was cute, though! I had a couple drinks (a meh mojito and a very tasty mango mule), Steven had a terrible beer, and we split a cauldron of guac, which is served with tortilla, plantain, and malanga (!) chips. (The plantain chips were my favorite.) I snapped a photo of the guacamole, but said photo was boring, so here’s a pic of Rosie staring up at us and wishing she were snoozing away back home instead.

Invigorated by the lovely late summer weather, I headed to the pool after our Paladar excursion. It was surprisingly quiet for a Saturday, and I spent the time when I wasn’t swimming listening to an audiobook and indulging in a decidedly un-summery activity: knitting! I got the urge to pick up my knitting last week, when I started a hat on our drive to Asheville. Now I’m going full-steam ahead and getting a head start on my winter projects.

When I came home from the pool, Steven was just wrapping up a very tasty dinner: BBQ heart of palm sandwiches, served with a carrot-y, lime-y guacamole! Guac twice in one day; how indulgent.

(I apologize for that awful photo, I was quite hungry and could barely wait to snap a picture before diving into my sandwich!)

And here we are, at the end of the day(ish) and the end of the month. What a great start to the long weekend, though — I hope the next two days are as enjoyable! Gotta savor these warm, late-summer moments while we still have ’em.

Late Summer in the Garden | VeganMoFo 2019 Day Thirty

A bit of a departure for today’s post! Rather than talk about prepared food, let’s talk about ingredients that come straight from the source — my garden!

Things are wild out there this time of year. All the vine-like plants are twining themselves around any upright stalk they can find, creating dense vine-y thickets. The tomato cages are groaning under the plants’ weight; after a rainstorm, I have to go outside and set them upright because they’ll invariably have fallen over. And finally — finally! — my pepper plants are thriving, even the ones that I planted months ago, right when the weather got hot, the way they like it.

Today I trial-picked a few carrots. I’ve never had much luck with carrots, possibly because my soil is pretty dense, even when I mix in compost and add a few bags of garden soil. But this year things are looking promising!

I planted purple nebula carrots, and although they’re a bit short and stubby at this point, they’ve got a unique and slightly tart bite. (Unfortunately, they’re just plain orange on the inside, not purple!)

I plan to do some fall sowing this year, and I think I’ll go heavy on the carrots — I received a few packs of free carrot seed samples with various seed purchases earlier this year, so I’ve got some fun varieties to try out.

I’m also growing these fun Mexican sour gherkins — basically, tiny roundish cucumbers (although they’re not truly in the cucumber family). These plants really took off about a month ago and have gone bonkers since then. They’re actually the prime offenders when it comes to vine sprawlage: They’ve spread out over my middle garden bed, climbed up my pepper plants (pictured at right), and have even jumped across to the first garden bed, where they’ve hitched a ride on a tomato cage. They definitely require some serious trellising, but this makeshift approach works just fine too.

The plants are producing like mad, and I picked a few today to try them out for the first time. I’m not sure how large they’re supposed to be when you pick them, so it’s possible mine were slightly immature. (Shown at left in my carrot-stained hands.)

I loved the taste and texture — crisp and refreshing and just a bit sour. They have a slight resistance but burst in your mouth easily, a bit like a cherry tomato, in a very pleasing way. I’m all about veggies you don’t have to cut or peel to enjoy. Easy snackin’! I’ll happily grow these guys again. They’d be fun and rewarding for kids to grow and pick, too; they require very little attention and are clearly opportunistic little buggers, even when you don’t provide a trellis!

There’s plenty more going on, too, from big mystery squashes that may’ve been cross-pollinated to the stalwart green beans, which are only now beginning to slow down. A single okra plant is only just beginning to take off, and there are already a few baby okras growing. (I don’t know why they didn’t do well this year! Last year the plants were taller than me and produced like mad.)

And, of course, the tomatoes are going strong as ever. They’re all exceptionally sweet this year, making them a real delight to eat right off the vine. Although the cherry tomatoes are most prolific, my larger slicers are finally picking up, and I’ve got quite a few big green ones slowly ripening.

Here’s a funny sight — a mystery squash growing on the opposite side of the house, opportunistically climbing up the fence between our neighbors’ and our yards, between the pokeweed and the hedges. This is pretty close to the spot where our neighbors have their garden, so I bet this is a volunteer from one of their plantings last year (or maybe some escaped seeds from this year). There are two of these plants between our yards. The fruits look like immature butternut squash to me, but we’ll see! I’ve done literally nothing to nurture these little babies, yet look how strong and vital they are. Sometimes I think it would be fun to literally throw a bunch of seeds into the wild patches of my yard and see what comes up. :)

A Vegan Italian Sub | VeganMoFo 2019 Day Twenty-Nine

This morning, I was chilly getting out of the shower. This means only one thing: autumn is coming. 

NOOOO.

Ugh, I’m not ready! I am a perpetual heat-seeker, a lizard in human form, a freak who loves humidity and scorching temperatures. I require at least one more month of warmth before descending into the interminable chill. No talk of apple picking or pumpkin spice or colorful leaves will change my mind. Dramatic sigh.

Super glamorous work desk shot, right here.

Enough of that. Onto the food. Today was a bit odd, meal-wise. I had an unforgivably light breakfast (a single Larabar, ugh!) and thus was required to eat my lunch (leftovers from yesterday) around 11. My stomach was grumbling by 1, so I had a peach, and then knew I’d require a more substantial second lunch. Well, I just so happened to have a 2:00 dermatologist appointment right next door to Firehouse Deli (that of the surprisingly wide vegan selection), so I was compelled to get a vegan Italian sub (cold cuts, cheese, mayo, lettuce, tomato, an herby vinaigrette). All in the name of supporting local businesses, right?!

It was just what the doctor ordered (not my dermatologist; she didn’t order anything). Super filling, relatively inexpensive, and quick. And while I was there, I noticed a sign for the Impossible Burger — apparently they’re serving it now! (And by “sign,” I mean that they printed out a graphic from the Impossible Burger site and pasted it onto a piece of cardboard. Adorable.) Good to know!

So, having had a 3:00 p.m. lunch, when will I be hungry for dinner?! I suspect I’ll feel some rumblings around 7. I’m about to put a loaf of sourdough bread in the oven, and I’ve got some Violife cheddar from last week’s sandwiches… perhaps a grilled cheese with garden tomatoes is in order, with a side of kale salad. We shall see.

(Oh, and about the weather — it jumped back into the 80s today and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. So it’s only the chilly nights and mornings that are harbingers of autumn’s inevitable arrival.)

Hoisin Mock Pork with Soba Noodles | VeganMoFo 2019 Day Twenty-Eight

I think that having a weekend away (or really, dining on food other people made) has reset my tastes: I’m feeling the noodle, sauce, and veg bowls that I’d gotten a bit weary of last week. And that’s good news, because they are just so easy.

Tonight I tried out the mock pork I purchased a few weeks back, making a veganized version of this hoisin pork recipe. The “sauce” in that recipe is meant as a marinade, so I altered it a bit (reducing the soy sauce, mostly) and thickened it up to function as an actual sauce.

I used my ubiquitous green beans from the garden and shredded carrots as the veg in this recipe and served it all over soba noodles rather than rice noodles — I prefer the former, not least because they’ve got more protein! I topped it off with sliced scallions and a generous sprinkling of sesame seeds.

The results were… not nearly as tasty as my mock duck experience. :( First, the pork itself is just inferior. The duck had unique, specific flavor and texture, whereas the pork really didn’t. Second, the sauce was not great. There is a LOT going on in that recipe, to its detriment. The one I made for the duck was far tastier. So, altogether, it was not a terrifically inspiring dinner, though it certainly wasn’t bad. Just a bit of a disappointment, and it sat in my stomach for quite a while — we just got back from a post-dinner trip to the gym, and I’m feeling a bit queasy. (Though that probably won’t stop me from devouring a bowl of ice cream that Steven apparently bought yesterday. Surprise ice cream is the best ice cream!)

In fresher and tastier news, today a coworker brought in a huge bag of fresh organic peaches — she buys them at a farmers market for $10 a bucket, but can’t use them all, so she very kindly shares them with us. She brought in a bag last week, and I helped myself to a few, but this week I was a bit greedier. There were quite a few left at the end of the day, so hey, why not take a bowlful?! I already blanched, peeled, sliced, and froze the ones from last week, and I’ll probably do the same with these. It’ll be nice to have summery peaches as the weather cools. (Assuming I can exercise some self-restraint and not bake with them, like, next week!) I may also make some peach jam. I did that with some apricots and nectarines last month and it was just so tangy and delicious. Maybe peach-basil jam for something fun?!