Where to Find Ethically Made Vegan Winterwear

Original photo by Roberto Trombetta on Flickr // vegan ethical fashion

Original photo by
Roberto Trombetta on Flickr

A few weeks ago I stumbled across a big ol’ master directory of ethically made winterwear, listing everything from thermal undies to big puffy parkas. And while it was a pretty comprehensive list, it was also not entirely relevant to me as a vegan: If I wanted to see which brands had products free of down or leather or wool, I had to click through and do my own investigation. Plus, it didn’t include a few all-vegan brands that I know produce their products ethically. I sighed and thought to myself, why not compile my own list of brands producing ethically made winter clothes without animal products? And thus, this list.

I’ve categorized this post by product type to help you find the specific items you need, so some brands are included in multiple sections. I’ve also marked fully vegan winterwear brands in case that’s important to you, and I’ve included what rating the company gets from Good On You, an app that evaluates brands’ ethics in terms of labor, the environment, and animal welfare. (Learn more here.) The app is fairly new and has mainly focused on Australian brands, so not all brands mentioned here are rated. That doesn’t mean they are not using ethical practices, however!

Let me know if I’ve missed your favorite brand!

Where to find ethically made vegan winter coats

Brave Gentleman (fully vegan)

Who they are and what they offer: Don’t let the name fool you: Brave Gentleman doesn’t just produce vegan clothing for men. According to its FAQ, the brand is “geared toward individuals who enjoy menswear aesthetics because there is a disproportionate emphasis on femme lifestyle products in the “eco”, “green” and “ethical” realm.” Fair enough! As of November 2018, the brand has just a few vegan jacket styles, but this tweed-y double-breasted overcoat is a great option if you’re looking for a classic overcoat style. (It’s also available in houndstooth, plaid, and solid colors.)

Why it’s ethical: Brave Gentleman ensures that workers receive a living wage and healthcare coverage. All styles are vegan, and the brand works to minimize pollution and use sustainable materials.

Good on You rating: Not yet rated

How to save: I haven’t seen Brave Gentleman offer sales, but I don’t follow this brand terribly closely. Checking BG out on social media might be your best bet.


Finisterre

Who they are and what they offer: Founded with the goal of producing sustainable garments for British surfers (yes, really), Finisterre has a few solid vegan options among its wool-heavy line. The packable Nimbus is available for both women and men, and many of the parkas are also free of animal products.

Why it’s ethical: The company uses eco-friendly materials like recycled polyester, and it was founded with sustainability as a key practice. It’s also a B Corp. Finisterre doesn’t use leather, fur, angora, or down.

Good on You rating: Good

How to save: Sign up for the mailing list for a discount, and be sure to check the sale sections.


Hoodlamb (fully vegan)

Hoodlamb's sustainably made vegan Nordic puffer

Image copyright Hoodlamb

Who they are and what they offer: This cheeky Amsterdam-based company relies on hemp — that darling of the sustainable fashion world — to create parkas, bombers, hoodies, sweaters, and more for both women and men. Need something über-warm to get you through a Nordic winter? Try one of the thigh-length puffers. Seeking something more casual to wear indoors to avoid cranking up the heat? Check out one of the long hoodies.

Why it’s ethical: Clean-growing hemp is the backbone of most products, and the company uses certified organic textiles in its shell fabric. All products are vegan, and Hoodlamb carefully chooses the factories that produce its garments (see more here).

Good on You rating: Great

How to save: Full-price items are not cheap, but sign up for the mailing list to get access to sales. You’ll find deep, deep discounts in the off-season.


Patagonia

Who they are and what they offer: This well-known activewear brand offers plenty of vegan options for men, women, and kids. The Nano Puff jacket protects you from winter and water; try the Snowbelle jacket for a versatile, 3-in-1 option.

Why it’s ethical: Patagonia is arguably a pioneer in the realm of ethical activewear; it uses eco-friendly materials, has a repair and reuse program, incorporates many sustainable practices, and is quite transparent about its supply chain and workers’ wages. It’s also a certified B Corp.

Good on You rating: Good

How to save: Check out the web specials section or shop for Patagonia projects at various outdoorsy stores. Moosejaw, REI, and Sierra Trading Post all sell Patagonia and have clearance/sale sections.


Save the Duck (fully vegan)

Who they are and what they offer: An Italian brand, Save the Duck makes down-alternative coats, jackets, and vests for women, men, and children. You’ll find both puffer styles and parkas in just about every color.

Why it’s ethical: Save the Duck uses no animal products and says its garments are “environmentally friendly.” (See below for more info.)

Good on You rating: Not good enough
(Save the Duck claims to use sustainable practices but hasn’t provided enough information for Good on You to fully evaluate those claims. I’m not sure I want to keep Save the Duck on this list, given those concerns, so let me know what you think.)

How to save: You’ll pay top dollar for brand-new items; sign up for the mailing list for the occasional sale. (Last Black Friday, discounts peaked at 40%.)


Vaute Couture (fully vegan)

Photo by Anthony TwoMoons for Vaute Couture; Belden coat

Photo by Anthony TwoMoons for Vaute Couture

Who they are and what they offer:  Founded by designer Leanne Mai-Ly Hilgart, this fashion-forward brand made its name offering hand-sewn, ethically made vegan winterwear for women and men. The Belden is a classic women’s style, and I love the Charles for men. Vaute even makes gender-neutral styles! (I’ve also written more about Vaute Couture here.)

Why it’s ethical: This vegan brand relies on sustainable materials and ensures that all its products are made in the USA by employees making a living wage.

Good on You rating: Great

How to save: Check out the clearance section for discounts, and sign up for emails to get notified.

Note: Vaute Couture will be on hiatus after this season as Hilgart figures out what to do with the brand and tries to scale up. Read more here.


Where to find ethically made vegan winter boots

While many ethical footwear companies offer vegan boots, I’m only featuring styles that are specifically designed for winter. So you won’t find vegan dock boots, work boots, Chelsea boots, etc. on this list. As such, please consider this a curated, highly subjective list, and know that more options exist if you don’t need heavy-duty winter boots designed to keep out the snow, keep you warm, and keep you from slipping on ice!


Beyond Skin (fully vegan)

Who they are and what they offer: A vegan company offering dozens of styles for women, Beyond Skin‘s has baked ethics into its business philosophy. Serious vegan winter boot offerings are scarce, but check out the Misty vegan sheepskin boots (also available in black) if you want an Uggs-esque look. (Note that as of November 2018, Beyond Skin only offers women’s shoes but says it’ll be launching a men’s collection soon.)

Why it’s ethical: Beyond Skin strives to use recycled materials when possible and produces its shoes ethically in Spain.

Good on You rating: It’s a start

How to save: Check the sale section!


Bhava Studio (fully vegan)

Photo copyright Bhava Studio

Who they are and what they offer: This small, woman-owned vegan company produces a limited line of fashion-forward women’s shoes — including some extremely stylish winter boots. Check out these faux fur-lined combat-style winter boots and these winter platforms (!) in particular.

Why it’s ethical: Bhava uses recycled materials and organic cotton and manufactures its shoes in Europe under fair labor conditions. It’s also committed to promoting a healthier approach to fashion, focusing on the idea that less is more when it comes to your closet. Learn more here.

Good on You rating:  It’s a start

How to save: Use my referral link to sign up for Bhava’s rewards program — you’ll get $30 off your first purchase. Once you’ve joined the program, you can earn points by completing relatively simple tasks (liking Bhava on Facebook; completing your profile) and redeeming the points for gift cards. And be sure to follow Bhava on Instagram for access to special pre-order sales.


Jambu

Who they are and what they offer: Sporty shoes with a bit of style is the name of the game at Jambu. While winter boots don’t make up the majority of their line, you’ll still find a few vegan styles for the colder months. (Note that although Jambu does offer some men’s shoes, their selection is very limited — women will have better luck with this brand. )You’ll find all the vegan options here;  try the Evans boot if you’ve got light winters, and check out Lorna if you need serious warmth and traction.

Why it’s ethical: Jambu has an impressive variety of animal-free shoes for all seasons, and they say their manufacturers in China are “strictly monitored.” (I can’t find much information on their overall sustainability practices, and I’m a little skeptical about their manufacturing. I’m not 100% sure they belong on this list and will reach out to the brand for more details.)

Good on You rating: Not rated yet

How to save: Check the sale section for deals. (Also, fellow vegan blogger Amey is a Jambu ambassador and frequently offers special discount codes — check out her vegan Jambu reviews for details!)


Kamik

Kamik vegan winter bootsWho they are and what they offer: A family-owned Canadian brand, Kamik sells winter boots (along with rain boots and sandals) for men, women, and kids. A vegan filter makes it easy to find animal-friendly options; there are plenty of vegan winter boots for women this season. Options range from these no-nonsense tall snow boots to this fun pair — they look like moon boots to me! (I own an older style and really like them — they’re cute without being too trendy, and they have nice sturdy treads perfect for icy conditions.)

Why it’s ethical: Kamik is working toward a zero-waste production facility, uses recycled materials in their boots, and makes the majority of their products in North America. Plus, they offer a recycling program so your old and well-loved footwear doesn’t end up in a landfill.

Good on You rating: Not yet rated

How to save: Subscribe to their email to get deals or check the banner near the top of the page for special sales. You can sometimes also find marked-down boots on Amazon.


Vegetarian Shoes (fully vegan)

Who they are and what they offer: An OG vegan shoe brand based in the UK, Vegetarian Shoes offers plenty of styles for men and women — including a few winter-appropriate options. The unisex Ice Patrol style is a great no-nonsense option, or try the Caribou if you live in gentler climes.

Why it’s ethical: Vegetarian Shoes uses no animal products and ensures that workers are treated fairly. That said, I haven’t been able to find much information about the products and materials they use — I need to look into this a little more!

Good on You rating: Not yet rated

How to save: Check the sale section!


Where to find ethically made vegan winter sweaters/jumpers

American Giant

Who they are and what they offer: American-grown cotton and American-made garments for both men and women are at the center of American Giant‘s business model. Check them out if you’re in the market for casual apparel — think sturdy pullovers, heavy-duty (yet stylish) moto sweaters, and cozy hoodies. The company offers free returns on any item at any point in time for any reason, a quality guarantee that demonstrates how strongly they stand behind their products.

Why it’s ethical: Everything is made in the USA, and the vast majority of products are made of cotton. (American Giant just introduced a merino-blend sweater.)

Good on You rating: Not yet rated

How to save: Discounts are rare, but sign up for the mailing list so you get first dibs on their yearly sale. New customers can also score 15% off with my referral link.


PACT Apparel

Who they are and what they offer: My favorite source for fair-trade, organic cotton basics (think hoodiessocks, and undies) for men, women, and kids, PACT also recently introduced a line of sweaters. This cable-knit tunic sweater looks lovely and cozy, but I really like the oval cardigan. In fact, I recently took advantage of a sale to buy it at half price. The thistle heather color is just gorgeous!

Why it’s ethical: Organic cotton, fair-trade practices, and no animal products make PACT one of the best options out there.

Good on You rating: Great

How to save: Use my referral link and get 20% off your first order! Then sign up for PACT’s mailing list for frequent discounts, like the aforementioned half off a single item.


Vaute Couture (fully vegan)

Who they are and what they offer:  Founded by designer Leanne Mai-Ly Hilgart, this fashion-forward brand made its name offering hand-sewn, ethically made vegan winterwear for women and men. Although Vaute primarily offers coats and jackets, you can find a smattering of beautiful sweaters too. This cabled aran knit style is beautiful, as is this cocoon-like cardigan. (I’ve also written more about Vaute Couture here.)

Why it’s ethical: This vegan brand relies on sustainable materials and ensures that all its products are made in the USA by employees making a living wage. Most sweaters are made of recycled materials.

Good on You rating: Great

How to save: Check out the clearance section for discounts, and sign up for emails to get notified.

Note: Vaute Couture will be on hiatus after this season as Hilgart figures out what to do with the brand and tries to scale up. Read more here.


Where to find ethically made vegan winter hats, gloves, mittens, scarves, and more

Hoodlamb (fully vegan)

Hoodlamb's sustainably made vegan infinity scarf

Image copyright Hoodlamb

Who they are and what they offer: This cheeky Amsterdam-based company relies on hemp — that darling of the sustainable fashion world — to create parkas, bombers, hoodies, sweaters, and more for both women and men. Happily, they also offer some lovely accessories, including a few for children. I love me an infinity scarf, and this faux fur-lined hat looks so cozy. Shopping for kiddos? They’d look adorable in this cute beanie!

Why it’s ethical: Clean-growing hemp is the backbone of most products, and the company uses certified organic textiles in its shell fabric. All products are vegan, and Hoodlamb carefully chooses the factories that produce its garments (see more here).

Good on You rating: Great

How to save: Full-price items are not cheap, but sign up for the mailing list to get access to sales. You’ll find deep, deep discounts in the off-season.


Where to find ethically made vegan socks and vegan base layers for winter

Why lump vegan base layers and vegan winter socks together? For one, they serve a similar purpose in my mind. But also… there just aren’t a lot of ethical companies making vegan versions of these items! Yes, you can find vegan socks pretty easily, but few are what I’d call winter-specific. Honestly, I usually just double up on my socks if I really need to keep warm in the winter! 

PACT Apparel

Who they are and what they offer: PACT offers fair-trade, organic cotton basics (think hoodiessocks, and undies) for men, women, and kids. I think you could also get away with using their leggings as base layers.

Why it’s ethical: Organic cotton, fair-trade practices, and no animal products make PACT one of the best options out there.

Good on You rating: Great

How to save: Use my referral link and get 20% off your first order! Then sign up for PACT’s mailing list for frequent discounts, like the aforementioned half off a single item.


Patagonia

Who they are and what they offer: This well-known activewear brand produces some of the best base layers for vegans looking to avoid wool. Patagonia’s Capilene base layers come in myriad weights, styles, and sizes for women, men, and children and use a recycled polyester fabric to keep you cozy. Just be sure to avoid the Capilene Air line — that one is blended with merino (boo!).

Why it’s ethical: Patagonia is arguably a pioneer in the realm of ethical activewear; it uses eco-friendly materials, has a repair and reuse program, incorporates many sustainable practices, and is quite transparent about its supply chain and workers’ wages. It’s also a certified B Corp.

Good on You rating: Good

How to save: Check out the web specials section or shop for Patagonia projects at various outdoorsy stores. Moosejaw, REI, and Sierra Trading Post all sell Patagonia and have clearance/sale sections.


A few notes and thoughts
  • I think there’s a real discussion to be had about the ethics of recycled wool vs. synthetics. Read any list of recommendations for winterwear and wool gets rave reviews: It wicks away moisture, it keeps in heat without getting you sweaty, and it doesn’t trap stinkiness. As an ethical vegan, though, I haven’t worn wool in years because the industry is absolutely horrendous from an animal welfare perspective. But to be honest, the alternatives — synthetics or cotton — don’t quite measure up. Cotton tends to get a bit sweaty, while synthetics are produced at quite a cost to the environment (as is non-organic cotton). Recycled or secondhand wool may be the way to go if you’re comfortable with that option, though I’m still not quite comfortable with it for myself.
  • Many of the points above also apply to recycled down. Patagonia offers a recycled down collection, but I personally don’t feel comfortable using it.
  • This is a very truncated list — I will add more to it as I do more research!

Bear in mind that I am just one person trawling the internet, so I’m sure I’ve left some brands out! Please leave a comment if I’ve missed your favorite ethical vegan brand and I’ll add it to the list.

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Where to find ethically made vegan outerwear // govegga.com

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Vegan on Etsy: Bags, Purses, and Backpacks

vegan on etsy cruelty free etsy

Welcome to the first installment of my new series: Vegan on Etsy! I want to include more of the “lifestyle” in this here “food and lifestyle blog,” and what better way than highlighting the independent makers of Etsy? It’s my go-to source when I’m in the market for any new good; even if I ultimately purchase something elsewhere, Etsy is a crucial part of my research. As part of my drive towards minimalism and to do my small part to combat the overabundance of cheaply, unethically made goods, I try to make purchases with intention. I’m not perfect, but I’m trying — and I’d like to help you try, too. In this series, I’ll focus on different purchases one could make on Etsy, and I’ll call out cruelty-free, vegan options that catch my eye.

Up first: bags! purses! Or as my Grammy would say, pocketbooks. For cruelty-free, sustainably made handbags, wallets, and accessories, Matt and Nat is rightfully popular in the world of vegan shopping. But there are other options, especially on Etsy. (Which is not to knock Matt and Nat — I have two bags and an iPad case from them that I love and use regularly.) Recently, I was in the market for a cross-body, travel-friendly, not-super-fancy-but-also-smart-looking satchel-type bag I could use while traveling but also for work, if necessary. A tall order? You betcha. But Etsy came through. I’ll share my choice at the end of this post, but first I’d like to highlight some of the other cruelty-free bags I found during my research. I reached out to the owners of these shops and they all graciously chatted about their businesses and why they’ve chosen to offer only cruelty-free goods.

First, a note about prices: you are unlikely to find uber-cheap goods on Etsy, and if you do, you ought to question whether they’re truly made independently. The vast majority of Etsy’s makers are small independent creatives who really love what they do, and they do it well. You get what you pay for, and quality isn’t cheap. As I’m moving towards a smaller, more intentional and long-lasting wardrobe, I’m becoming okay with paying a little more for something that will last longer and be a true staple. Your mileage may vary!

100% Vegan Shops

Badimyon

If you’re into a utilitarian yet wholly unique aesthetic, Badimyon is a great place to start, with bags made of leftover materials from the upholstery and home décor industries.  Badimyon means “inside your imagination” in Hebrew, and the husband and wife team who run it live in an intentional community in Hakuk, Israel.

The community now includes 50 families who share similar values of self-sustainability, sharing and ecology,” founder Elad says. With a school system for the kids, yoga classes, and discussion circles, it sounds like a heavenly place to live — and to be creative. The founders strive to offer high-quality, limited-edition products, and their current line features everything from wallets up to roomy hobo bags in a variety of fabric and prints. I particularly like the neutrals; they’re a great unisex option.

Image copyright Badimyon

Image copyright Badimyon

My favorite product is this canvas backpack. I love the sleek shape and style and that it’s large enough to fit a laptop without looking bulky. Plus, Badimyon gives you the option to create a customized backpack by letting you mix and match fabrics.

The pricing here is about average for bags of this sort, and shipping from Israel to the US will be about $13.

Beg for a Bag

Despite its name, Beg for a Bag won’t leave you begging for options! Alongside typical options like messenger bags and backpacks, they also offer yoga mat bags, diaper bags, and even a doggie harness. Most items feature muted neutrals, although there are a few fun prints for the diaper bags.

Image copyright Beg for a Bag

The Shay tote caught my eye as an ideal travel bag. With lots of pockets and a zippered top, it’s roomy enough to stash all your essentials (including a laptop!) while still offering security.

Beg for a Bag’s prices skew a little higher than its competitors’, as does its shipping — about $15 to the US.

Cocoono Bags

Custom-made in a small workshop in Poland, Cocoono’s offerings are inspired by nature — their designs are available in cool beiges, greys, and taupes. I appreciate that they stick to about six styles and offer variations on those styles by updating the colors and patterns; it’s nice to see confident makers who do what they do and do it well. Cocoono just launched a limited-edition line for 2016 which features cruelty-free faux wool. It’s a really neat look!

Image copyright Cocoono Bags

Image copyright Cocoono Bags

I’m so intrigued by this Mega Shopper Bag! Most of my reusable shopping bags are anything but stylish, and that’s fine for groceries. But I admit to feeling a little strange on the few occasions when I buy clothes in a store and ask the cashier to put them in a Trader Joe’s bag! This tote would be great to take shopping; it even has smaller internal pockets for your wallet and phone.

The bags in this shop are all priced very reasonably for styles of their ilk, and shipping is typically about $12 from Poland to the US.

Good Mood Moon

Based in Ukraine, July and Alex of Good Mood Moon are self-professed vegans and animal lovers. They create gorgeous faux-leather bags, belts, bracelets, and more. With a dizzying array of colors on offer, there’s something to fit everybody’s taste. They cater more towards style than pure functionality and are perfect if you want to make a statement with your piece. If you get bored easily, you’ll love the fact that you can switch out the straps on their clutches and a few purses — you can build a whole rainbow of options!

goodmoodmoon_floria

Image copyright Good Mood Moon

I’ve been coveting the Floria bag for a while now, but it’s a little small for an everyday purse for me. Plus, I don’t know whether I could choose a color — there are so many beautiful options! Mint, dark teal, and grey all appeal to me.

Good Mood Moon’s prices are quite reasonable for handmade goods, although shipping from Ukraine to the US should run you about $10. I think $30 is a good deal for the Floria bag!

Ed. note, 2/24/16: I saw the Floria bag in the wild at a vegan mac and cheese event in Baltimore, and I just had to talk to the owner. She said it fits all her items and she likes it… and I liked the look of it, too!

Ed. note, 8/11/16: I bought the Floria bag for myself this summer, in a pretty reddish pink. I really love the material and the overall size, but I do wish it had at least one interior pocket. 

Marten Lab

With unique minimalist designs and colorblock styling, Marten Lab’s bags feature lots of inner pockets — making them both visually appealing AND super functional. They also offer geometric-shaped clutches that would make fantastic statement pieces. When she started this line, vegetarian founder Martina Pretto considered using leather. But she couldn’t do it.

“I’d have to force myself in a direction that I’d never feel as “mine”. So I’m always looking for beautiful, durable and cruelty free materials,” Martina told me.

And I’m so glad she didn’t. Her gorgeous designs, handmade in Italy, are beautiful options for fashion-forward vegans.

Image copyright Marten Lab

Image copyright Marten Lab

In an alternate universe, I live in a small-but-bike-friendly city and bike to work, and I use this bag to carry my laptop. Sigh!

These unique and meticulously created pieces are priced accordingly, and note that shipping to the US from Italy is typically around $22.

MeDusa Brand

Unlike many of the shops on this list, MeDusa unapologetically offers bright, bold-colored handbags. Although I tend to prefer calmer neutrals, I have quite a few friends who barely own anything black and whose outfits are always bursting with color. From vinyl clutches with embossed patterns to more demure shoulder bags with just a little pizzazz, MeDusa has a little bit of everything — including a panda-inspired cross-body!

Image copyright MeDusa Brand

Image copyright MeDusa Brand

This sapphire-blue clutch is amazing! I love how it melds a very modern medium (vinyl) with a more traditional lacy design. This is a statement piece if ever I’ve seen one.

MeDusa products are easily the most expensive on this list — you’re paying for innovative techniques, after all. Shipping from Israel to the US is remarkably inexpensive, though, at around $7.

Nevabags

With laid-back styles and eclectic fabrics, this shop offers casual multi-purpose bags that look especially great for parents. Their signature style is a convertible bag that can function as a backpack, shoulder bag, handbag, or messenger bag. Netta (the shop owner) even has a YouTube video that shows how to use the convertible bag.

Netta is a vegan living in Israel, and she describes her business as an adventure: “I am constantly searching and discovering new materials and new sewing techniques, creating high quality products that resemble leather bags and purses, but are 100% vegan. Each bag is unique, and much thought and effort were put to it, from designing to creating. ” Hear, hear!

Image copyright Nevabags

Image copyright Nevabags

I love this color combo — I could see myself using it as a shoulder bag mostly, but having the option to switch to all those other types would be so helpful.

All the bags in this shop are around the $100 range, and shipping is about $12 from Israel to the US.

Taska Handbags

Handmade in small runs in Canada, the bags in this shop are unlike any others on this list. Founder Nadya says it best: “Utilitarian design and eye-catching fabric combinations is what I strive for with each collection.” With geometric angles and the surprising use of large prints on relatively small bags, these designs are fashion-forward and eye-catching.

Nadya noted a dearth of “vegan accessories (shoes and bags especially) that were stylish and special,” which inspired her to start her own line.  As an animal lover, she’s proud to offer “a more interesting option when it comes to finding good quality cruelty-free accessories.”

Image copyright Taska Handbags

Image copyright Taska Handbags

I’m a sucker for diagonal zippers, so I love the look of this tote. And I also love how functional it is, with lots of interior pockets and features to make it easy to grab all your essentials. I always appreciate when a designer thinks through the use cases for her products!

Táska’s bags are on the high end of this list’s price range, and shipping will cost about $11 from Canada to the US.

Tracce Bags

For the classic leather handbag look, Tracce Bags is a great choice. The faux leather bags come in an impressive number of styles, from a demure shoulder bag to a big ol’ tote embellished with gold studs. Most styles are offered in muted tones, but there are some brighter options, particularly in the collection of wallets.

The owner, Paola, has been vegetarian since 1987 (the year I was born!) and told me that she always wanted to create a line of cruelty-free bags. When she discovered vegan leather, she says she fell in love immediately — and since then, she’s been “drawing and sewing bags, all day, sometimes all night too!”

Image copyright Tracce Bags

Image copyright Tracce Bags

This simple black clutch is just darling! I’ve got quite a few weddings to attend in the next few years (hello, late 20s!), and this simple yet elegant style looks like just the thing to carry the essentials.

Tracce’s prices are on the high end, typical of what you might spend on a similar non-vegan purse, and shipping seems to be a straight $20 within the US. But Paola often offers coupon codes, so be sure to check her shop announcement and shop notes to find a deal.

Non-Vegan Shops that Offer Vegan Items

I am a firm believer in voting with my dollar and supporting cruelty-free options from otherwise non-vegan makers. If none of the bags on my previous list quite strike your fancy, maybe you’ll find something here. But if you’re uncomfortable purchasing from folks who use leather, I understand and respect your decision.

Atlas Past

Spoiler! I ended up purchasing my “cross-body, travel-friendly, not-super-fancy-but-also-smart-looking satchel-type bag I could use while traveling but also for work, if necessary” bag here. My exact bag is no longer available, but it’s similar to this cross-body option. The good folks at Atlas Past confirmed that all the fabric is synthetic — no wool there. I’m very happy with my purchase!

Aiko Threads

The smocked details on these purses are just so fetching! I think this messenger bag would certainly turn heads.

Blue Calla

With one-of-a-kind bags in a variety of styles and colors, you’ll have to check back often to see if a new design strikes your fancy. The calming color combo on this handbag is just up my alley.

byMart

Faux leather meets simple, striking patterns in this shop. I particularly like the eye-catching patterns of their cross-body bags.

Disturbingly Adorable

I couldn’t not include this shop, if only because their bags come in happy soy print. Who doesn’t want smiling tofus on their purse?!

Sinem Inugur

Sometimes you just need a simple all-purpose bag, and this one would certainly fit the bill. Sinem Inugur offers clean lines, classic designs, and quality construction.

Twill and Print

The light, airy colors, sweet designs, and nature-inspired prints in this shop are a breath of fresh air. I just adore the look of this purple clutch — that tessellation pattern in gold is killer!

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Let me know whether you found this list helpful or felt like something was missing! Feel free to share your favorite Etsy sellers… and happy vegan shopping. :)

(P.S. You can find a whole list of ethical clothing options on Etsy here!)

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#vegan bags, purses, and backpacks on #etsy! Resource for vegan shopping. // govegga.com

Note: I’ve updated this post to include affiliate links. If you purchase something through my link, it costs nothing extra for you, but I get a few pennies. I’m not looking to make a fortune, just to cover hosting costs. And my primary purpose here is to connect vegans with quality, handmade goods that help support small businesses and indie designers. :)